Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait with Cropped Hair. 1940

Frida Kahlo Self-Portrait with Cropped Hair 1940

  • Not on view

Though the Surrealists adopted Frida Kahlo as one of their own, the painter maintained that she did “not know if my paintings are Surrealist or not, but I do know that they are the most frank expression of myself.” She produced numerous self-portraits, each one an articulation of different facets of herself and her eventful life. Kahlo painted Self-Portrait with Cropped Hair in the wake of a particularly tumultuous time, just months after she divorced her famous husband, Mexican Muralist painter Diego Rivera. He had always admired her long, dark hair, which, as she indicates in the tresses littering the painting, she had cut off after their split. She also shows herself in an oversized suit resembling the ones that Rivera wore. Through such emotionally and symbolically charged details, Kahlo expresses her feelings about her relationship with Rivera while also asserting her sense of self as an independent artist.

Additional text from Modern Art & Ideas
Medium
Oil on canvas
Dimensions
15 3/4 x 11" (40 x 27.9 cm)
Credit
Gift of Edgar Kaufmann, Jr.
Object number
3.1943
Copyright
© 2018 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Department
Painting and Sculpture

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