• MoMA, Floor 5, 519 The Alfred H. Barr, Jr. Galleries

“A reunion between creative arts and the industrial world” is how architect Walter Gropius described the Bauhaus, the school of art and design he founded in 1919 in Weimar, Germany (it later moved to Dessau and then to Berlin). Conceived as a laboratory for radical artistic experimentation, the Bauhaus featured a curriculum that combined instruction in “form problems,” including space, color, and composition, with practical courses in the applied arts, such as metalwork, cabinetmaking, weaving, and typography. Bauhaus design objects typically deployed simple, harmoniously balanced geometries in the service of functional efficiency for the modern home and office.

The Bauhaus closed in 1933 under pressure from the Nazi Party, but its legacy continued abroad, as teachers and students, fleeing political persecution, found employment elsewhere in Europe and in North and South America. This gallery presents works produced at the school during the 14 years it was open, alongside works by former Bauhauslers created in the following decades.

33 works online

Installation images

How we identified these works

In 2018–19, MoMA collaborated with Google Arts & Culture Lab on a project using machine learning to identify artworks in installation photos. That project has concluded, and works are now being identified by MoMA staff.

If you notice an error, please contact us at [email protected].

Licensing

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MoMA licenses archival audio and select out of copyright film clips from our film collection. At this time, MoMA produced video cannot be licensed by MoMA/Scala. All requests to license archival audio or out of copyright film clips should be addressed to Scala Archives at [email protected]. Motion picture film stills cannot be licensed by MoMA/Scala. For access to motion picture film stills for research purposes, please contact the Film Study Center at [email protected]. For more information about film loans and our Circulating Film and Video Library, please visit https://www.moma.org/research-and-learning/circulating-film.

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