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TAG: ALFRED HITCHCOCK

Posts tagged ‘Alfred Hitchcock’
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January 28, 2014  |  An Auteurist History of Film
Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds

These notes accompany screenings of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds on January 29, 30, and 31 in Theater 3.

The Birds. 1963. USA. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Tippi Hedren and a feathered friend in The Birds. 1963. USA. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

In his seminal study of Alfred Hitchcock, critic Robin Wood focuses on the director’s career-long apprehension that civilization rests precariously on a very thin layer of what we accept as reality, but which covers a foreboding, underlying chaos. Read more

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July 31, 2012  |  An Auteurist History of Film
Alfred Hitchcock’s To Catch a Thief

To Catch A Thief. 1955. USA. Alfred Hitchcock

These notes accompany the screenings of Alfred Hitchcock’s To Catch a Thief on August 1, 2, and 3 in Theater 3.

By 1955, Alfred Hitchcock was enjoying a level of celebrity never attained before or since by a movie director, with the possible exception of Cecil B. De Mille when he was hosting Lux Radio Theatre. Read more

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May 29, 2012  |  An Auteurist History of Film
Alfred Hitchcock’s I Confess

I Confess. 1952. USA. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

These notes accompany the screenings of Alfred Hitchcock’s I Confess on May 30 and 31 and June 1 in Theater 3.

Alfred Hitchcock (1899–1980) has thus far been represented in our series by Blackmail (1929) and Notorious Read more

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June 22, 2010  |  An Auteurist History of Film
Alfred Hitchcock’s Blackmail
Blackmail. 1929. Great Britain. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Blackmail. 1929. Great Britain. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

These notes accompany screenings of Alfred Hitchcock’s Blackmail, June 23, 24, and 25 in Theater 2.

Alfred Hitchcock (1899–1980) is the leading example of a commercially successful film director who never lost his taste for innovation and experimentation. He must be something of an anathema to those on the avant-garde fringes of film whose whole career may not attract the audiences that Psycho (1960) or The Birds (1963) could garner in a single day. Yet, his body of work remains extremely personal and unified in its vision of a precarious universe. Read more