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Standing on a Lawn with Maira Kalman
Illustration from Girls Standing on Lawns by Maira Kalman

Illustration from Girls Standing on Lawns by Maira Kalman. © 2014 Maira Kalman

Maira Kalman—much-beloved artist, illustrator, writer, designer, and New Yorker—has been collecting vintage photographs for 30 years, seeking them out at antique shops, flea markets, and countless other places in the city and during her travels. Read more

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January 8, 2014  |  Family & Kids, Learning and Engagement
Adventures in Surrealist Family Art Workshops

As an educator at MoMA, one of the projects I have the most fun with is the Family Art Workshops. Workshops are programs where a museum educator leads a group through both a gallery experience and a hands-on art-making activity in a studio. I look forward to planning these, because usually museum educators do a lot of independent lesson planning, but for the workshops we get to work in teams. I’ve always loved collaborative brainstorming, so working together on these projects exercises that part of my brain. This fall, I put my head together with fellow Family Programs Educators Shannon Murphy, Keonna Hendrick, and Lynn Seeney to plan a workshop called Dreamscapes.

Our challenge was to make René Magritte’s work approachable for the workshop’s target age of four- to six-year-olds and their accompanying adults. Each educator teaching the workshop over the course of several weeks would do things slightly differently, but our general plan was to take families into the Magritte exhibition to discover how he painted everyday objects and made them strange or transformed in a variety of ways. After looking at and discussing a few paintings, we would head down to the studio to make Magritte-inspired Surrealist collages with cut shapes and patterned papers.

Our supplies were ordered, and we were ready to go, but there was one hiccup in our plans. By the time we hit late November/early December when our workshops were set to take place, the exhibition galleries were so crowded with Magritte devotees that we couldn’t reasonably expect groups of 20 kids and adults to maneuver through the space or sit on the floor to focus on paintings together.

Time for Plan B.

Looking at Surrealist paintings in the Museum's galleries. Photo: Johnny Tan

Looking at Surrealist paintings in the Museum’s galleries. Photo: Johnny Tan

Having a Plan B ready to go quickly and smoothly is the name of the game when you’re a museum educator, and we had a seasoned team of flexible educators contributing to this workshop. Luckily, we’re working at MoMA, where there is no shortage of great art, so we were able to shift our focus to some of the Surrealist works in the fifth-floor Painting and Sculpture Galleries. Thanks to the work of Marcel Duchamp, Giorgio de Chirico, and Salvador Dalí, we were able to get families to notice some of the main ideas—such as altering the way objects function, or compositional choices that create surreal spaces—that would help them collaborate on their own collage-style dreamscapes.

A MoMA educator demonstrating collage techniques. Photo: Johnny Tan

A MoMA educator demonstrating collage techniques. Photo: Johnny Tan

Participants working on collages. Photo: Johnny Tan

Participants working on collages. Photo: Johnny Tan

In the end, they may not have seen the Magritte paintings we’d originally intended to show, but the families who participated got to learn about transforming objects and settings to change a typical landscape into a mysterious dreamscape. And their collages would do any of the Surrealists proud, if you ask me.

A participant's finished collage. Photo: Rachel Ropeik

A participant’s finished collage. Photo: Rachel Ropeik

A participant's finished collage. Photo: Rachel Ropeik

A participant’s finished collage. Photo: Rachel Ropeik

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Introducing Young Frank, Architect
Cover of <i>Young Frank, Architect</i>

Cover of Young Frank, Architect, published by The Museum of Modern Art

Young Frank, Architect, MoMA’s first storybook for kids ages three to eight, follows the adventures of Young Frank, a resourceful young architect who lives in New York City with his grandfather, Old Frank, who is also an architect. Young Frank sees creative possibilities everywhere, and likes to use anything he can get his hands on—macaroni, old boxes, spoons, and sometimes even his dog, Eddie—to creates things like chairs out of toilet paper rolls and twisting skyscrapers made up of his grandfather’s books. But Old Frank is skeptical; he doesn’t think that’s how REAL architects make things.

One day, donning matching bow ties, straw boater hats, and Le Corbusier-inspired glasses, they visit The Museum of Modern Art, where they see the work of renowned architects like Frank Gehry and Frank Lloyd Wright. And they learn that real architects do in fact create wiggly chairs, twisty towers, and even entire cities. Inspired by what they see, Young Frank and Old Frank return home to build structures of every shape and size: “tall ones, fat ones, round ones, and one made from chocolate chip cookies.”

Spread from <i>Young Frank, Architect</i>

Spread from Young Frank, Architect

Spread from <i>Young Frank, Architect</i>

Spread from Young Frank, Architect

Spread from <i>Young Frank, Architect</i>

Spread from Young Frank, Architect

Written by award-winning children’s author and illustrator Frank Viva, a frequent cover artist for The New Yorker whose previous books include Along A Long Road and A Long Way Away, Young Frank, Architect is an inspiration for budding architects as well as a lesson for those who think they’ve seen everything. With its rich color palette of grays, olives, ambers, and cream (it’s printed using nine colors instead of the usual four), it’s a great introduction to MoMA’s diverse architecture and design collection, which includes surprising objects like Arthur Young’s helicopter in addition to furniture and architectural models.

Young Frank, Architect is a MoMA Exclusive for the month of August, meaning it’s available only at the MoMA Stores now through its wide release in September. Snag a copy and spend the dog-days of August exploring architecture. What will it inspire you to build?

To see more of Young Frank’s adventure, check out our video book trailer below.

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July 31, 2013  |  Artists, Family & Kids
MoMA Teens @ ARTBOOK @ MoMA PS1
Alya and Stephanie posing with an unfolded zine.

MoMA Teens Alya and Stephanie posing with an unfolded zine.

Last year’s Cross-Museum Collective was a whirlwind of incredible, art-related experiences, from behind-the-scenes tours of MoMA’s Security Department (thanks LJ!) to hanging out with the conservation staff (thanks Roger!) to spending week after week exploring the galleries of MoMA PS1 and the spectacular work there—it’s insane just how much we were able to accomplish. Read more

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July 17, 2013  |  Family & Kids, Tech
The MoMA Art Lab App: Looking for Richard

The MoMA Art Lab iPad app, released in the Apple Store about a year ago, is intended for children aged seven and above. Nine interactive activities feature a work in the Museum’s collection, along with descriptions of the artists’ processes. Read more

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My Friends Immersed in their Brilliant Work: Cross-Museum Collective Teens X Ryan McNamara
Alya Albert and Ryan McNamara holding hands as part of her performance piece

Alya Albert and Ryan McNamara holding hands as part of her performance

Alya Albert, 19, is an alumnus of our In the Making teen arts program and a second-year Cross-Museum Collective member. On Sunday May 19, she and the other CMC teens, under the guidance of artist Ryan McNamara, created a series of in-gallery performances and provocations at MoMA PS1. Read more

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Oldenburg’s Burgers: Delicious at All Ages
Cover of What is Contemporary Art? A Guide for Kids by Jacky Klien and Suzy Klein, published by The Museum of Modern Art

Cover of What is Contemporary Art? A Guide for Kids by Jacky Klein and Suzy Klein, published by The Museum of Modern Art

MoMA’s current exhibition, Claes Oldenburg: The Street and The Store, celebrates the early years of artist Claes Oldenburg’s extraordinary career, when he experimented with painting and sculpture by reworking the stuff of every day into larger than life objects made with unexpected materials. Read more

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March 6, 2013  |  Events & Programs, Family & Kids
Piecing it Together: A Family Artist Talk with Susan Kaprov

Susan Kaprov talking with families

Susan Kaprov talking with families


As part of Family Programs at MoMA, we invite artists and designers represented in MoMA’s collection to share their work and engage in conversation with family audiences. During the programs, artists show images of their work, share what inspires them, and give kids a sense of what it means to be an artist day in and day out. Read more

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January 24, 2013  |  Events & Programs, Family & Kids, MoMA Stores
Children’s Author Events Return to the MoMA Design Store in Soho

Photo: Michael Nagle

Photo: Michael Nagle

Back by popular demand, Children’s Author Events at the MoMA Design Store connect children with beloved authors whose imaginative stories come to life through readings and interactive workshops. Read more

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January 14, 2013  |  Century of the Child, Family & Kids
Exploring sound and space with the MoMA Studio: Common Senses Sound Map

Sound and space are closely linked. Our ears help define our surroundings by picking up on spatial clues in reflected sound waves. This innate ability to situate ourselves in our soundscape was probably more overtly useful in the days before electricity, when we had to rely on our ears to alert us to danger our eyes could not detect. There is, however, a movement in the visually impaired community to cultivate this ability Read more