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Inside Matisse’s Garden
TK

Interior spread from Matisse’s Garden. © The Museum of Modern Art. Illustration by Cristina Amodeo. © Cristina Amodeo

“One day the artist Henri Matisse cut a small bird from a piece of white paper. It was a simple shape but he liked the way it looked and didn’t want to throw it out. So he pinned it on the wall of his apartment to cover up a stain.”

Cover of Matisse's Garden, published by The Museum of Modern Art

Cover of Matisse’s Garden, published by The Museum of Modern Art

Thus begins Matisse’s Garden, the story of an endlessly curious artist who used scissors and painted paper to make something utterly new. Written by Samantha Friedman, an assistant curator at MoMA and co-organizer of the exhibition Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs, and featuring colorful cut-paper illustrations by Italian designer Cristina Amodeo, it’s an immersive introduction to Matisse’s vibrant cut-outs. Read more

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October 23, 2014  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions, Publications
Robert Gober in Time

Cover of Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor, published by The Museum of Modern Art

Cover of Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor, published by The Museum of Modern Art

Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor, published to accompany the artist’s retrospective at MoMA, is unconventional in a few ways. Read more

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September 23, 2014  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions, Publications
Toulouse-Lautrec’s Portraits of Paris: “I don’t detail you. I totalize you!”

Cover of the publication The Paris of Youlouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters from The Museum of Modern Art, published by The Museum of Modern Art

Cover of the publication The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters from The Museum of Modern Art, published by The Museum of Modern Art

“The Moulin Rouge hired the most famous dancers to perform the quadrille naturaliste (cancan), which delighted spectators with its swish of petticoats and flashing flesh as legs flew high—knickers optional,” writes Sarah Suzuki, Associate Curator in the Department of Drawings and Prints, in The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters from The Museum of Modern Art. The exhibition catalogue brilliantly chronicles the short life and career of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and the Parisian fin-de-siècle world he depicted. Suzuki creates a vivid portrait of the various elements of Lautrec’s life: the world of cafés, nightclubs, and the theater; women of the upper and lower classes; artists and writers; the culture of belle époque Paris. The catalogue accompanies the exhibition The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters, which features, almost exclusively, work from MoMA’s collection.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Miss Eglantine's Troupe (La Troupe de Mademoiselle Eglantine). 1896. Lithograph. Sheet: 24 1/4 x 31 1/4" (61.6 x 79.4 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Miss Eglantine’s Troupe (La Troupe de Mademoiselle Eglantine). 1896. Lithograph. Sheet: 24 1/4 x 31 1/4″ (61.6 x 79.4 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller

Born to aristocratic parents who were first cousins, Toulouse-Lautrec was afflicted with genetic abnormalities. He stopped growing in his early teens at the height of four feet, 11 inches, and as he continued to mature, the growth of his nose and lips outpaced that of his face, causing drooling, lisping, and sinus troubles. Physically unfit for many of the social and sporting elements central to aristocratic life, Toulouse-Lautrec moved to Paris to study art, where he pursued both his creative and social life with vigor. He spent his days working on painting and lithography, and his absinthe-fueled nights at the opera, theaters, cafés, or nightclubs. His life and work merged; he became a chronicler of the Montmartre scenes he frequented.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Aristide Bruant in his Cabaret (Aristide Bruant dans son cabaret). 1893. Lithograph. Sheet: 53 3/4 x 37 15/16" (136 x 96.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Emilio Sanchez

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Aristide Bruant in his Cabaret (Aristide Bruant dans son cabaret). 1893. Lithograph, sheet: 53 3/4 x 37 15/16″ (136 x 96.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Emilio Sanchez

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Seated Clowness (Mademoiselle Cha-u-ka-o) (La Clownesse assise) from Elles. 1896. Sheet: 20 7/8 × 15 13/16" (53 × 40.2 cm).  One from a portfolio of twelve lithographs. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Seated Clowness (Mademoiselle Cha-u-ka-o) (La Clownesse assise) from Elles. 1896. One from a portfolio of twelve lithographs, sheet: 20 7/8 × 15 13/16″ (53 × 40.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller

Suzuki describes Toulouse-Lautrec’s subjects as “resoundingly populist.” She writes, “Toulouse-Lautrec was a nightly visitor to the theater, the circus, and the opera, finding tremendous freedom and inspiration in those milieus.” Toulouse-Lautrec portrayed the performers he adored, like “The Clowness,” Mademoiselle Cha-u-ka-o, a nightclub entertainer.

An 1893 lithograph shows Toulouse-Lautrec’s friend Aristide Bruant, the proprietor of the Mirliton—a Montmartre café. Although Bruant is shown in profile, his back to the viewer, contemporaries would have immediately recognized his large felt hat and velvet coat; the portrait rests on social signifiers rather than on faithful depiction. Suzuki explains that Toulouse-Lautrec “used the low-cut dress of La Goulue, the high-stepping posture of Jane Avril, the gloves of Yvette Guilbert, and the profile of Valentin, rather than traditional portrait likenesses. Toulouse-Lautrec himself was quoted telling Guilbert, ‘Ma chere, I don’t detail you. I totalize you!’”

Using MoMA’s extensive collection of Toulouse-Lautrec’s prints, posters, journals, songs sheets, theatre programs, and illustrated books as her inspiration, Suzuki paints a portrait of an artist whose unique biography, persona, and taste is clearly reflected in his art. She places Toulouse-Lautrec squarely in and of his historical milieu, positing that his work might be seen as a visual distillation of the spirit of the Parisian belle époque.

Don’t miss the exhibition, on view at MoMA now through March 22, 2015. To learn more about Toulouse-Lautrec, download a free preview of the catalogue, or visit MoMAStore.org to purchase the book.

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A Literary Guide to a Sensory Experience
Cover of Lygia Clark: The Abandonment of Art, 1948–1988, published by the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Cover of Lygia Clark: The Abandonment of Art, 1948–1988, published by the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Lygia Clark: The Abandonment of Art, 1948–1988 is the companion catalogue to the exhibition under the same title, co-organized by Luis Pérez-Oramas, The Estrellita Brodsky Curator of Latin American Art, MoMA, and Connie Butler, Chief Curator, Hammer Museum, with Geaninne Gutiérrez-Guimarães and Beatriz Rabelo Olivetti, Curatorial Assistants, Department of Drawings and Prints, MoMA. The first comprehensive retrospective to take place in North America, this landmark exhibition is matched by the accompanying publication, containing 13 chapters and 380 plates. Read more

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The Art of Picasso as You’ve Never Seen It Before
Cover image of the e-book Picasso: The Making of Cubism 1912–1914, published by MoMA. All works by Pablo Picasso. ©  2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Cover image of the e-book Picasso: The Making of Cubism 1912–1914, published by MoMA.

MoMA recently launched its first digital-only publication, Picasso: The Making of Cubism 1912–1914, edited by Anne Umland and Blair Hartzell, with Scott Gerson. This immersive, interactive study features over 400 high-resolution images and the latest research on 15 groundbreaking Cubist works created by Picasso between 1912 and 1914, and is available as an iPad app through the App Store, or an interactive PDF through MoMAstore.org. Read more

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Sigmar Polke Der Illusionist
Cover of Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963-2010, published by the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Cover of Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963-2010, published by the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010 is the first comprehensive Sigmar Polke retrospective to cover the broad range of mediums he worked in from 1963 until his death in 2010. The accompanying catalogue is as comprehensive and diverse as the show, Read more

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Standing on a Lawn with Maira Kalman
Illustration from Girls Standing on Lawns by Maira Kalman

Illustration from Girls Standing on Lawns by Maira Kalman. © 2014 Maira Kalman

Maira Kalman—much-beloved artist, illustrator, writer, designer, and New Yorker—has been collecting vintage photographs for 30 years, seeking them out at antique shops, flea markets, and countless other places in the city and during her travels. Read more

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January 15, 2014  |  Collection & Exhibitions, Publications
Paying Tribute: Ileana Sonnabend: Ambassador for the New
Cover of the publication Ileana Sonnabend: Ambassador For the New, published by The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Cover of Ileana Sonnabend: Ambassador For the New, published by The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Ileana Sonnabend: Ambassador for the New is the catalogue published to accompany the exhibition of the same name currently on view at MoMA. Both are a tribute to art dealer and gallerist Ileana Sonnabend (1914–2007) for her taste and enduring influence. Read more

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December 19, 2013  |  Collection & Exhibitions, Publications
Portrait of an Artist: Isaac Julien: RIOT

Riot cover

Cover of the publication Isaac Julien: RIOT, published by The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Isaac Julien: RIOT is not your typical exhibition catalogue. With most of the writing done by artist and filmmaker Isaac Julien himself, it is more like an illustrated intellectual biography. Read more

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December 11, 2013  |  Collection & Exhibitions, Publications
The Pleasures of Living Well
Cover of <i>Living Well Is the Best Revenge</i>

Cover of Living Well Is the Best Revenge

First published in 1971 and newly reissued by MoMA, Living Well Is the Best Revenge by New Yorker staff writer Calvin Tomkins is the now-classic account of the lives of Gerald and Sara Murphy, two fascinating American expatriates who lived an extraordinary life in France in the 1920s. Read more