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September 19, 2016  |  Behind the Scenes
An Ending…and an Exciting New Chapter

Yoshitomo Nara. Don’t say goodbye. 1992–2000. Pencil on graph paper, 8 1/4 x 5 3/4″ (21 x 14.6 cm). Gift of David Teiger in honor of Agnes Gund. © 2016 Yoshitomo Nara

Inside/Out readers, it has been a great run. Now it’s time to start something new.

After seven terrific years, we are ceasing production on Inside/Out to focus our energies on a forthcoming MoMA publication on Medium. That publication, featuring longer-form articles about the artists, ideas, movements, techniques, and disciplines that continue to shape global art and culture, will debut in mid-October, so please stay tuned for more details.

Rest assured that existing posts aren’t going anywhere, but no new articles will appear on Inside/Out moving forward.

We are sincerely grateful to all of our readers, and especially to those who have shared comments, corrections, and encouragement over the years. We hope to see all of you next month on Medium.

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September 16, 2016  |  Artists, Behind the Scenes
Art/Work: MoMA’s Creative Minds: Elizabeth Riggle

Elizabeth Riggle has been a full-time preparator at the Museum for 16 years (not counting the four years she was a temporary employee). Selflessly, Elizabeth gives her all to make every part of the exhibitions she works on perfect. Her attention to detail comes through in her lush, flowing, painterly works that mine an array of forms including flowers, bones, or comic book characters. A freedom of movement, play, and rich palettes happily seduce the viewer. Immerse yourself!

MoMA: When are you able to work on your artwork?

I live like I’m in the military. I have to be rigorous about my schedule weekends are not weekends. True for a lot of us in this position.

What is the best and worst part of being an artist working at the Museum? Read more

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September 13, 2016  |  Artists, Behind the Scenes
Art/Work: MoMA’s Creative Minds: Mark Williams

Mark has been a full-time preparator at the Museum for 22 years, as well as a practicing artist for over 40 years. He has exhibited extensively in the United States, Europe, and most recently in Asia. Mark’s unassuming, sweet demeanor belies an intelligent, articulate, and committed painter who has not shied away from experimenting and pushing his work in new directions. Take a look.

All artwork by Mark Williams. Beat. 1994. Acrylic on wood, 8” x 32”. “This is the first painting I made when I changed the guidelines of my art making.”

MoMA: When are you able to work on your artwork?
Evenings and weekends; I’m pretty disciplined about that. I look at each coming week and pencil in studio time. There is always something I can do even if it is 5 to 10 minutes. If I looked for the perfect block of time it would make it prohibitive to get any work done.

What is the best and worst part of being an artist working at the Museum? Read more

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September 7, 2016  |  Behind the Scenes, Conservation
Original Stretcher for Picasso’s Guernica Rediscovered in MoMA Storage

Stored away between the paintings and sculptures in MoMA’s storage facility lay a forgotten treasure from the Museum’s past: 11 disassembled pieces of the original stretcher from a Pablo Picasso masterpiece. Museum registrars rediscovered the group of stretcher bars during routine organization earlier this year, and since stretchers are occasionally replaced to ensure that a canvas is adequately supported, the discovery did not immediately strike them as significant. However, the large size and design of the parts of one stretcher were very unusual. Read more

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Restoring Teiji Furuhashi’s Lovers
The view from the entrance of Teiji Furuhashi's Lovers. 1994. Computer controlled, five-channel laser disc/sound installation with five projectors, two sound systems, two slide projectors, and slides (color, sound), overall 32' 10" x 32' 10" (1000 x 1000 cm). Gift of Canon Inc. © 2016 DUMB TYPE. Photo: Ben Fino-Radin

The view from the entrance of Teiji Furuhashi’s Lovers. 1994. Computer controlled, five-channel laser disc/sound installation with five projectors, two sound systems, two slide projectors, and slides (color, sound), overall 32′ 10″ x 32′ 10″ (1000 x 1000 cm). Gift of Canon Inc. © 2016 DUMB TYPE. Photo: Ben Fino-Radin

Imagine yourself standing in a dark, cavernous space: a perfectly square room with a high ceiling and black walls so dark that the clean, glossy white floor seems suspended in space. In the center of the room a tall metal tower beams light and emits the robotic sounds of computer-controlled motors. Read more

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Resurrection: The Conservation Treatment of Bruce Conner’s CHILD
From left: 1960 photograph of CHILD by Geoffrey Clements; 2015 photograph of CHILD prior to conservation treatment; CHILD after treatment in January 2016.

From left: 1960 photograph of CHILD by Geoffrey Clements; 2015 photograph of CHILD prior to conservation treatment; CHILD after treatment in January 2016

In the summer of 2014 the Department of Painting and Sculpture approached sculpture conservation to inquire if Bruce Conner’s work CHILD could be restored. CHILD was created in 1959 as a response to the sentencing of death-row inmate Caryl Chessman who had been incarcerated for the kidnapping and sexual molestation of a woman in Los Angeles. Conner responded to this high-profile capital punishment case and his visceral repulsion to it by creating a frightening sculpture of a deformed corpse-like child. Made from casting wax, the figure appears strapped to a wooden highchair with belt and twine, the head tilted backwards with a gaping or screaming mouth, and body veiled in torn and stretched nylon stockings. Read more

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A Strange New (and Old) Typeface: Creating a Custom Font for Degas
Title wall of Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty at The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Vanessa Lam

Title wall of Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty at The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Vanessa Lam

Looking at the exhibition Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty, one can immediately sense how strikingly modern the artworks feel, even after 120 years. Organized by senior curator Jodi Hauptman and curatorial assistant Heidi Hirschl, the show features the artist’s experimental and radical works that have rarely been attached to the widely conceived notion of “Degas” (two words: pink tutus). Read more

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April 6, 2016  |  Behind the Scenes, Events & Programs
The Kids Are All Woke: Experiencing a BFA’s Worth of Art in 10 Weeks with BHQFU

Creating spaces for free, hands-on art experiences is a cornerstone of the educational and artistic philosophies guiding our work within Teen and Community Partnerships here at MoMA. For far too many young people living in NYC, the idea of pursuing (or even exploring) a career in the arts can seem frivolous, intimidating, and, ultimately, unattainable. Add the high cost of undergraduate and graduate education to these gaps in basic accessibility and the difficulties young artists face are compounded exponentially. With these ideas in mind, this season saw MoMA Teens working with the staff and community of artists from Bruce High Quality Foundation University, or “New York’s freest art school,” as they aptly describe themselves. Set up as an introductory “art school for people who hate school,” the 10-week program they developed has taken the participating teens through the strange, scary, and oftentimes outlandish world of a college-level fine arts degree, as seen through the wonderfully distorted BHQFU lens. Below Andrea and Sean, our two BHQFU collaborators, share their experiences here so far.

—Calder Zwicky, Assistant Director for Teen and Community Partnerships, MoMA

BHQFU Merit Badges

BHQFU merit badges

Donae and Igor tackle the Robert Indiana LOVE sculpture as an exercise in Institutional Critique

Donae and Igor tackle Robert Indiana’s LOVE sculpture as an exercise in institutional critique

For the past season, the Bruce High Quality Foundation University has had the pleasure of working with 25 incredibly sharp teenagers from across the five boroughs of New York City. In a world that has robbed many of them and their peers of a stable, prosperous future, we’re learning together about the social and political power of art.

And they’re all about it.

Each week, we invited a Bruce family member to lead a guest workshop outlining their studio working methods, political motivations, and cultural influences. This resulted in a crash course of sorts, a hyper-accelerated BFA experience that not only showed how art is made, but why art is made and for whom. The best part has been, our students got to experience all of this for free, thanks to this incredible program, MoMA’s In the Making teen art courses. At the end of each class, participants earned a merit badge celebrating the techniques and concepts they’d learned to add to their BHQFU camo vests. We’re earning them, too, and we’ll all have pretty killer art education maps on our backs at the exhibition opening on April 15.

Eamon Monaghan teaching us DIY video and set design

Eamon Monaghan teaching us DIY video and set design

Students recreating famous works from the MoMA Collection

Recreating famous works from the MoMA collection

Visiting Artist, James Sprang teaches Jeancarlo some camera tricks

Visiting artist James Allister Sprang teaches Jeancarlo some camera tricks

We learned about Institutional Critique + Critical Pedagogy through a brief history of the Bruce High Quality Foundation and BHQFU that culminated in a group “sculpture tackle” of Robert Indiana’s iconic LOVE work located a few blocks from MoMA. Rapper and visual artist James Allister Sprang (AKA GAZR), himself an alumnus of the MoMA Teens Apprentice Educator program, showed us the connection between Performance Art + Pop Art, challenging us to incorporate personal narrative and critiques of popular culture into our art. Queens-based sculptor Anne Wu encouraged us to see the human touch evident everywhere in the urban environment of New York, and how to translate sketches of the world around us into three-dimensional sculptural objects. Eamon Monaghan shared the secrets of his DIY Video + Set Design process as we learned how to construct miniature film sets and how to splice ourselves into them using the green-screen method. Continuing that DIY theme, the artist collective Packet Biweekly discussed the political value of Artist Books + Self-Publishing, working with us to knock out a brand new collaborative artist book in a single class session. We deconstructed, figuratively and literally, imagery from mass media, reconfiguring those images to reflect our individual perspectives through a Collage + Media Literacy workshop with artist Ariel Jackson. And we tapped into the other side with Orlando Estrada, whose Psychic Intuition + Alchemy class taught us relief mold sculpture techniques hinged on improvisation and drawing exercises encouraging us to find a sixth sense.

BHQFU MoMA Teens are woke!

BHQFU and MoMA Teens are woke!

Packet Biweekly is an artist run publication created by Chris Nosenzo, Nicole Reber, and Christine Zhu with the generous help of their assistant, Daisy.

Packet Biweekly is an artist-run publication created by Chris Nosenzo, Nicole Reber, and Christine Zhu with the generous help of their assistant Daisy

Getting ready to play with some plaster

Getting ready to play with some plaster

Consistently, our students have expressed their discontent with the way things are in the world—justifiably so! It’s easy to get jaded, right? But the thing is: none of them are jaded. They’re fired up and they’re making plans. Collectively and individually, they’re beyond driven. They are demanding an alternative future. BHQFU is equally fired up as we see in action the inarguable value of accessible art education. Our students are unafraid of speaking truth to power, of dismantling structures designed to marginalize them. Each of them is in possession of a truly unique voice and perspective, and they’ve learned the skills to amplify that voice through creating art.

Mya made art based on her experiences with racism

Mya made a project based on her experiences with racism

Amira & Erin look through an issue of Packet Biweekly

Amira & Erin look through an issue of Packet Biweekly

Join us on April 15 for the opening of the In the Making: Spring 2016 Teen Art Show. We’re so fortunate to have met the next generation of merry pranksters and political dissidents. We can’t wait to show you what each of them can do.

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February 12, 2016  |  Behind the Scenes, Library and Archives
Don, the MoMA Guard Dog

June 3, 1933. New York Herald Tribune. Public Information Records, I.Z. [mf 43;257]. The Museum of Modern Art Archives, New York

New York Herald Tribune. June 3, 1933. Public Information Records, I.Z. [mf 43;257]. The Museum of Modern Art Archives, New York

In June 1933, Don, a German Shepherd, was given to The Museum of Modern Art by Vanity Fair magazine’s kennel department. Frank Crowninshield, editor of the magazine, was a trustee of the Museum. Read more

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February 12, 2016  |  Behind the Scenes, Collection & Exhibitions
MoMA Collects: Andres Serrano’s Piss and Blood

Andres Serrano. Piss. 1987. Chromogenic color print, 40 × 60" (101.6 × 152.4 cm). The Museum of Modern Art. The Abramson Collection. Gift of Stephen and Sandra Abramson. © 2016 Andres Serrano

Andres Serrano. Piss. 1987. Chromogenic color print, 40 × 60″ (101.6 × 152.4 cm). The Museum of Modern Art. The Abramson Collection. Gift of Stephen and Sandra Abramson. © 2016 Andres Serrano

For a number of years MoMA’s Department of Photography has sought to collect works by the American photographer Andres Serrano (b. 1950), and an exciting acquisition finally came to fruition through the generosity of Stephen and Sandra Abramson, who gifted to the Museum two Serrano works, Piss (1987) and Blood (1987). Read more