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CATEGORY: BEHIND THE SCENES

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November 7, 2014  |  Artists, Behind the Scenes, MoMA Stores
Meet Artist Elsa Mora at the MoMA Design Store Soho

This weekend multimedia artist Elsa Mora, who designed one of MoMA’s signature holiday cards this year, will bring her incredible cut-paper creations to the MoMA Design Store in Soho. Shoppers, creatives, and art aficionados alike can stop by to see her work come to life, and meet with Mora in person. Read more

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October 31, 2014  |  Behind the Scenes
Four Years of MoMA Halloween Pumpkins
Maniac Pumpkin Carvers' Halloween re-creation of Henri Matisse's Blue Nude sits in the MoMA film lobby

Maniac Pumpkin Carvers’ Halloween re-creation of Henri Matisse’s Blue Nude sits in the MoMA film lobby

For the fourth year running, MoMA visitors who pass through the Museum’s film entrance during the days leading up to Halloween are treated to an iconic modern-art masterpiece—in seasonally appropriate pumpkin form. This year, in celebration of the Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs exhibition, the knife-wielding crazies at Maniac Pumpkin Carvers have “cut out” a beautiful interpretation of Matisse’s Blue Nude. Read more

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The Conservation of Henri Matisse’s The Swimming Pool

The centerpiece of the exhibition Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs, Matisse’s remarkable room-size cut-out The Swimming Pool returns to the MoMA galleries for the first time in more than 20 years. In this video, MoMA’s Department of Conservation shares a behind-the-scenes look at the process of conserving this beloved artwork, and in the text below conservator Laura Neufeld provides background on the project. Read more

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September 18, 2014  |  International Program
Building Global Networks: The 2014 International Curatorial Institute
MoMA Chief Conservator Jim Coddington addresses International Curatorial Institute participants in MoMA’s paintings conservation lab

MoMA Chief Conservator Jim Coddington addresses International Curatorial Institute participants in MoMA’s paintings conservation lab. Photo: Sarah Lookofsky

This July, MoMA’s International Program invited modern- and contemporary-art curators from around the world to participate in the 2014 International Curatorial Institute, a new two-week intensive program focused on leadership development and organizational strategy. Designed in collaboration with the Center for Curatorial Leadership (CCL) with the aim of expanding participants’ capacity to tackle leadership challenges facing 21st-century museums Read more

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September 10, 2014  |  Behind the Scenes
Better Living through Comfort: MoMA Security Gets a New Look
MoMA Security staff sporting their new, UNIQLO-designed uniforms

MoMA Security staff sporting their new, UNIQLO-designed uniforms

If you’ve been to MoMA this summer, you may have noticed that our security team is sporting a stylish new look. As part of MoMA’s ongoing partnership with the Japanese retailer UNIQLO, designer Naoki Takizawa and his team created a security officer uniform that brought together MoMA’s focus on art and design and UNQLO’s commitment to comfort and innovation. Read more

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Modern Art through Contemporary Eyes: Correspondence from MoMA’s International Program
From left: Alexander Calder. The Big Gong. 1952. IC/IP, I.A.56. The Museum of Modern Art Archives; Installation view of Calder's The Big Gong (top) in Twelve Modern American Painters and Sculptors, Musée National d’Art Modern, Paris, 1953. IC/IP, I.A.64. The Museum of Modern Art Archives

From left: Alexander Calder. The Big Gong. 1952. IC/IP, I.A.56. The Museum of Modern Art Archives; Installation view of Calder’s The Big Gong (top) in Twelve Modern American Painters and Sculptors, Musée National d’Art Modern, Paris, 1953. IC/IP, I.A.64. The Museum of Modern Art Archives

This past year the MoMA Archives processed and opened to the public the full record history of MoMA’s International Council and International Program, a collection so large that it required the work of three staff members to complete it in one year. One benefit of processing a large collection as a team was the opportunity to share our most interesting discoveries with one another. Read more

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February 12, 2014  |  Artists, Behind the Scenes, MoMA Stores
Maurizio Cattelan and Pierpaolo Ferrari Bring Toiletpaper to the Table
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A scene from MoMA Design Store’s spring catalog cover shoot featuring Seletti Wears Toiletpaper, a suite of dishes, mugs, and tablecloths created by Maurizio Cattelan and Pierpaolo Ferrari for Seletti

This season the MoMA Design Store is pleased to announce the launch of an exclusive new series of artist-produced wares. To celebrate these artistic collaborations we’re going share with Inside/Out readers a behind-the-scenes look at the process of designing these exciting products, and background about the artists involved. Read more

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Frank Lloyd Wright’s “Living City” Lives On: Conserving the Broadacre City Model

Drawing of Broadacre City by Frank Lloyd Wright. From B. Pfeiffer, Frank Lloyd Wright 1943–1959: The Complete Works [Vol. 3], edited by Peter Gössel, published by Taschen, 2009

Drawing of Broadacre City by Frank Lloyd Wright. From B. Pfeiffer, Frank Lloyd Wright 1943–1959: The Complete Works [Vol. 3], edited by Peter Gössel, published by Taschen, 2009


MoMA and Columbia University’s Avery Library recently made an acquisition sure to excite even the most casual architecture fans: the Frank Lloyd Wright Archive. In addition to many thousands of drawings, photographs, and ephemera, this collection includes over 60 models and building fragments. One of the largest and most expansive models is that of Broadacre City—Frank Lloyd Wright’s utopian reimagining of the city as open space and landscape rather than skyscraper and skyline. Read more

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January 27, 2014  |  Behind the Scenes, Learning and Engagement
User-Testing Sessions for MoMA Audio+: Learning by Listening and Watching

Following over a year of research and development by a cross-departmental team, MoMA Audio+ mobile guide debuted in July 2013, replacing the handheld audio guides that the Museum had been distributing for many years. MoMA Audio+ enables visitors not only to listen to audio commentaries and read interpretive texts about works of art, but also offers the ability to take and share photographs, locate works of art and facilities, and e-mail yourself a record of your visit using the My Path feature.

A visitor in the galleries using the MoMA Audio+ mobile guide. Photo: Martin Seck

A visitor in the galleries using the MoMA Audio+ mobile guide. Photo: Martin Seck

Testing and assessment has been key to the process of developing MoMA Audio+. Built using a method called agile development, in the months leading up to launch, the development team released and tested functional versions of the app as it was being built. Based on testing and feedback, we could iteratively implement improvements to the user interface and features to better enhance visitor experience. After launch, we conducted assessment from a variety of perspectives: visitors returning the mobile guide were interviewed about their experience, Antenna staff distributing the mobile guide were surveyed, and user-testing sessions were conducted.

MoMA Audio+ desk. Photo: Martin Seck

MoMA Audio+ mobile guide distribution desk. Photo: Martin Seck

How Does User Testing Work?

Nine individuals were recruited to participate in user testing. Participants represented a mix of ages and genders, as well as varying interests, work experiences, and technical abilities. User testing took place in December over the course of three mornings in the American Modern exhibition. Three participants were scheduled for each 60- to 90-minute session, and for every participant there was a lead facilitator and a cofaciliator. The lead facilitator guided the participant through the directed-testing instrument, prompted and asked for clarification as needed, and took notes. The cofaciliator also prompted as needed, asked questions, and took notes. For each session, there was also at least one additional staff person floating between groups and observing. Participants were asked to think out loud and voice any questions or concerns as much as much as possible during the testing.

Testing the MoMA Audio+ device with visitors in the galleries. Photo: Claire Huddleston

A user-testing participant with facilitators in the galleries. Photo: Claire Huddleston

So, what did we learn?

A lot! I’ve been working in museum evaluation for a few years and am constantly amazed by the amount and depth of information that even a small group of user-testing participants can provide. While some of the insights offered confirmed our own thoughts about the mobile guide, there were also plenty of things they pointed out that we did not realize were barriers to a smooth user experience. Along with critical feedback, it was also great to hear what people enjoyed about using MoMA Audio+.

Here are some of the overall findings from the user testing sessions:
What did users really like about MoMA Audio+?

• The amount and variety of content available for them to access
• The high quality images presented on the device
• The camera feature, My Path feature, and other functions that allowed them to personalize and share their experience at MoMA

What aspects of MoMA Audio+ did users find difficult or confusing?
• Locating the How To use MoMA Audio+ instructions
• Understanding and locating all the layers of content and features available
• Locating specific artworks using the map

We really appreciated all the critical feedback these user testing participants offered because it helps us find ways to improve on what we currently offer visitors. Of course, we also loved that 89% (N=9) felt that MoMA Audio+ is something that would enhance their experience in the galleries. A few comments from participants included:
• “I feel that MoMA Audio+ enhances what I came to see here. Thousands of things on view and this helps me to shape my visit.”
• “It added another dimension. Nothing replaces the act of looking, but knowing more about what I’m seeing enriches the experience. This achieves that goal. Devices are not too heavy, not burdensome, not ugly, nice MoMA graphic.”
• “Usually, I just want to be with the art and wander around but I really like the ability this device gives you to document what you see during your visit. Personalizes the experience”

A visitor in the galelries using the MoMA Audio+ device. Photo: Martin Seck

Using the MoMA Audio+ mobile guide to document a performance in the galleries. Photo: Martin Seck


Have you tried MoMA Audio+ on one of your visits to the Museum yet? If you did, we’d love to know what you thought!

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MoMA’s Jackson Pollock Conservation Project: Bringing the Project to Conclusion: Restoration of Number 1A, 1948

Jackson Pollock. Number 1A, 1948.  1948. Oil and enamel paint on canvas, 68” x 8’8.” On view at MoMA in a recent acquisitions exhibition in 1950

Jackson Pollock. Number 1A, 1948. 1948. Oil and enamel paint on canvas, 68” x 8’8.” On view at MoMA in a recent acquisitions exhibition in 1950


Readers who have been following the blog will recognize a pattern in our approach to conservation treatment of Number 1A, 1948, the final of three Jackson Pollock paintings that have been the focus of our 18-month project. Read more