Roz Chast. Panel from Museumland (detail). 2021. Courtesy the artist

“I’m curious about how other people make pictures,” says longtime New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast, whose story details her love of museums during the pandemic. Though she is best known for her satirical drawings, she is no stranger to working in the autobiographical mode. In 2014, her graphic memoir about her parents’ final years, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?, won the the National Book Critic Circle Award for Autobiography and was a finalist for the National Book Award. An avid museum-goer, Chast readily admits to stealing: “But never a whole style—that would be sad and weird. For better or worse, probably worse, I am who I am. It’s more like: nice wallpaper pattern. I can use that.”

Roz Chast is a longtime cartoonist for the New Yorker. In 2014, her graphic memoir about her parents’ last years, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?, won the Kirkus Prize, the National Book Critic Circle Award for Autobiography, and was a finalist for the National Book Award. She has illustrated many children’s books and humor books, and her work has been compiled in several cartoon collections.