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CATEGORY: COLLECTION & EXHIBITIONS

Posts in ‘Collection & Exhibitions’
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January 29, 2016  |  Collection & Exhibitions
MoMA Collects: Rafael Barradas, Kim Beom, William Johnson, Chris Ofili, Kara Walker, and Others

In mid-January, two of MoMA’s six curatorial departments—Painting and Sculpture, and Drawings and Prints—held acquisitions meetings to usher into the Museum’s collection new artist’s books, posters, fabric installations, painted sculptures, and more. These meetings take place quarterly and, over the course of the year, result in the addition of hundreds of works—spanning mediums, geographies, and histories—to create an overall collection that is continuously evolving. Read more

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A Day-by-Day Look at Katharina Gaenssler’s Bauhaus Staircase photo-mural

For Ocean of Images: New Photography 2015, MoMA commissioned Katharina Gaenssler to create a photo-mural right outside the exhibition galleries on the third-floor platform of the Museum’s Bauhaus Staircase, which is inspired by Walter Gropius’s famous staircase in the Bauhaus building in Dessau, Germany. Gaenssler photographed that stairway, as well as two works that reference it, both in MoMA’s collection: Bauhaus Stairway (1932) by Oskar Schlemmer and Bauhaus Stairway (1988) by Roy Lichtenstein. She collaged the resulting thousands of pictures together in an installation that explores the relationship between MoMA and the influential modernist school, tracing the history of the Bauhaus’s monumental contribution to the history of art and architecture through works of imitation and homage. In the process, she adds a new artwork to this lineage. Read more

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January 27, 2016  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
MoMA Collects: Simone Forti’s Dance Constructions

Before moving to New York in 1959, choreographer Simone Forti spent four heady, formative years in San Francisco. There, she trained with the postmodern dance pioneer Anna Halprin, who rejected the stylistic constraints of ballet and modern dance. On Halprin’s outdoor dance deck in wooded Marin County, Forti explored improvisation, her motions guided by a keen alertness to the body’s anatomy. She also organized open-work sessions with her then husband, the Minimalist artist Robert Morris, gathering artists for communal, multidisciplinary explorations of movement, objects, sound, and light. Read more

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January 22, 2016  |  Do You Know Your MoMA?
Do You Know Your MoMA? 1/22/16

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How well do you know your MoMA? If you think you can identify the artist and title of these works from MoMA’s collection—all currently on view in the Museum—please submit your answers by leaving a comment on this post. We’ll provide the answers next month (on Friday, February 19). Read more

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January 15, 2016  |  Five for Friday
Five for Friday: The Art of David Bowie

Five for Friday, written by a variety of MoMA staff members, is our attempt to spotlight some of the compelling, charming, and downright curious works in the Museum’s rich collection.

To call David Bowie an art enthusiast would be something of an understatement; at times it seemed that his very existence was an art project. Read more

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January 15, 2016  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Marcel Duchamp’s Readymades: Celebrating the Centennial
Marcel Duchamp’s letter to Suzanne Duchamp, January 15, 1916. Jean Crotti papers. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution

Marcel Duchamp’s letter to Suzanne Duchamp, January 15, 1916. Jean Crotti papers. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Read the full translation below

In 1913 Marcel Duchamp topped a kitchen stool with a bicycle wheel, “fork down” through a hole he had drilled in the seat, and parked this wheel-on-a-stool in his Paris studio. “I didn’t have any special reason to do it,” he later recalled. Read more

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January 13, 2016  |  Artists, Collection & Exhibitions
Joaquín Torres-García’s Creative Paradox
Installation view of Joaquín Torres-García: The Arcadian Modern at The Museum of Modern Art, New York (October 25, 2015–February 15, 2016). Photo: Jonathan Muzikar. © 2016 The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Installation view of Joaquín Torres-García: The Arcadian Modern at The Museum of Modern Art, New York (October 25, 2015–February 15, 2016). Photo: Jonathan Muzikar. © 2016 The Museum of Modern Art, New York

When Joaquín Torres-García returned to his native Uruguay in 1934, he was 60 years old and had lived abroad for more than 40 years. During the first years of his American relocation, before he became the referential Master at Taller Torres-García, he founded and directed the Asociación de Arte Constructivo, the achronym for which—AAC—appears signed on most of his paintings from 1935 to 1938. During these years Torres-García created a series of black-and-white abstract paintings that constitute one of the most striking repertoires of synthetic abstraction ever produced in the Americas. Read more

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January 12, 2016  |  Collection & Exhibitions
Radio On

One of the all-time best Christmas presents I ever received was a tiny black plastic transistor radio. It came with a single ear plug, a corded wrist strap, and a thin black vinyl case. There are no words to describe how absolutely fabulous it was, but I have a wonderful memory of bebopping through the snow across the street to my best friend’s house on Christmas night with my new little black transistor radio pressed up close to my ear. I couldn’t wait to show it to her. Read more

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January 8, 2016  |  Collection & Exhibitions
New Photography and MoMA’s Collection, Part 1

The New Photography exhibition series—which Quentin Bajac, The Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator of Photography, has called “a window on the Museum’s approach to photography”—has been an influential vehicle for acquisitions for three decades. Read more

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January 6, 2016  |  Collection & Exhibitions
Endless Kazuyo Sejima
Kazuyo Sejima & Associates. Model of Villa in the Forest, Chino, Nagano, Japan. 1992–94. Acrylic, 6 1/2 x 29 1/2 x 29 3/4" (16.5 x 74.9 x 75.6 cm). Gift of the architect in honor of Philip Johnson. © 2016 Kazuyo Sejima. Photo: Anna Blair

Kazuyo Sejima & Associates. Model of Villa in the Forest, Chino, Nagano, Japan. 1992–94. Acrylic, 6 1/2 x 29 1/2 x 29 3/4″ (16.5 x 74.9 x 75.6 cm). Gift of the architect in honor of Philip Johnson. © 2016 Kazuyo Sejima. Photo: Anna Blair

Some visitors to MoMA’s Endless House: Intersections of Art and Architecture exhibition tell me Frederick Kiesler’s designs don’t have enough windows. His Endless House couldn’t have connected the inhabitants with their environment, they say, comparing Kiesler’s model to Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House, a glass and steel box intended to float among the trees. Read more