Aristide Maillol. The River. Begun 1938-39; completed 1943 (cast 1948)

Aristide Maillol

The River

Begun 1938-39; completed 1943 (cast 1948)

Medium
Lead
Dimensions
53 3/4" x 7' 6" x 66" (136.5 x 228.6 x 167.7 cm), on lead base designed by the artist 9 3/4 x 67 x 27 3/4" (24.8 x 170.1 x 70.4 cm)
Printer
Alexis Rudier
Credit
Mrs. Simon Guggenheim Fund
Object number
697.1949
Copyright
© 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris
Department
Painting and Sculpture
This work is on view in the Sculpture Garden, with 16 other works online.
Aristide Maillol has 27 works online.
There are 1,560 sculptures online.

The daring instability and torsion of The River are rare in Maillol's sculpture. Instead of trying to emulate the dynamism of twentieth-century life, as did so many artists of his time, Maillol usually sought an art of serenity and stillness, of classical nobility and simplicity. As late as 1937, in fact, he remarked, "For my taste, there should be as little movement as possible in sculpture." Yet within a year or so afterward he had conceived The River, a work in which the movement is almost reckless.

Commissioned to create a monument to a notable pacifist, the French writer Henri Barbusse, Maillol conceived the sculpture as a work on the theme of war: a woman stabbed in the back, and falling. When the commission fell through, he transformed the idea into The River. In a departure from the usual conventions of monumental sculpture, the figure lies low to the ground and rests apparently precariously on the pedestal, even hanging below its edge. Twisting and turning, her raised arms suggesting the pressure of some powerful current, this woman is the personification of moving water.

Publication excerpt from The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA Highlights, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, revised 2004, originally published 1999, p. 169

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