Paul Klee. The One in Love (Der Verliebte) from Masters' Portfolio of the Staatliches Bauhaus (Meistermappe des Staatlichen Bauhauses). 1923

Paul Klee

The One in Love (Der Verliebte) from Masters' Portfolio of the Staatliches Bauhaus (Meistermappe des Staatlichen Bauhauses)

1923

Medium
Lithograph from a portfolio of three lithographs, three woodcuts and two etchings
Dimensions
composition: 10 13/16 x 7 1/2" (27.4 x 19.1 cm); sheet: 13 9/16 x 10 9/16" (34.4 x 26.9 cm)
Publisher
Staatliches Bauhaus, Weimar (Bauhausverlag G.m.b.H., Munich-Weimar)
Printer
Staatliches Bauhaus, Weimar
Edition
100
Credit
Larry Aldrich Fund
Object number
843.1956.3
Copyright
© 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn
Portfolio
Masters' Portfolio of the Staatliches Bauhaus (Meistermappe des Staatlichen Bauhauses)
Department
Drawings and Prints
This work is not on view.
This work is part of a portfolio with 6 other works online.
Paul Klee has 144 works online.
There are 21,064 prints online.

The range of approaches in this portfolio evidences the lack of a single Bauhaus style. All of the contributors were "masters," or artist-teachers, at the school. Vasily Kandinsky, László Moholy-Nagy, and Lothar Schreyer created abstract compositions. Paul Klee offered a whimsical erotic scene, while Gerhard Marcks provided a sentimental representation of a mother and child. Lyonel Feininger's and Georg Muche's works are formal experiments showing Cubist influences. What all these prints had in common was the artists' belief in the mission of the Bauhaus and its goal of reshaping modern life through art and design. The sales of the portfolio benefited the school, which was in dire need of funds during the period of runaway inflation in the early years of the Weimar Republic.

PUBLISHING HISTORY

As head of the Bauhaus printing workshop, Feininger directed the monumental project. In addition to designing the portfolio cover and lettering, he oversaw the hand-printing of the entire edition, a process that consisted of rendering more than eight hundred compositions of varying levels of technical complexity onto a range of papers. This painstaking production reflects Feininger's emphasis on the artistic, rather than the reproductive, aspect of printmaking as well as the Bauhaus's craft orientation in its early years.

Publication excerpt from Heather Hess, German Expressionist Digital Archive Project, German Expressionism: Works from the Collection. 2011.

This work is included in the Provenance Research Project, which investigates the ownership history of works in MoMA's collection.
Tore Hakansson, New York; sold to The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1956

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