Gerrit Rietveld. Red Blue Chair. c. 1923

Gerrit Rietveld

Red Blue Chair

c. 1923

Medium
Painted wood
Dimensions
34 1/8 x 26 x 33" (86.7 x 66 x 83.8 cm), seat h. 13" (33 cm)
Credit
Gift of Philip Johnson
Object number
487.1953
Copyright
© 2016 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / Beeldrecht, Amsterdam
Department
Architecture and Design
This work is not on view.
Gerrit Rietveld has 18 works online.
There are 9,462 design works online.
There are 635 furniture and interiors online.

In the Red Blue Chair, Rietveld manipulated rectilinear volumes and examined the interaction of vertical and horizontal planes, much as he did in his architecture. Although the chair was originally designed in 1918, its color scheme of primary colors (red, yellow, blue) plus black—so closely associated with the de Stijl group and its most famous theorist and practitioner Piet Mondrian—was applied to it around 1923. Hoping that much of his furniture would eventually be mass-produced rather than handcrafted, Rietveld aimed for simplicity in construction. The pieces of wood that comprise the Red Blue Chair are in the standard lumber sizes readily available at the time.

Rietveld believed there was a greater goal for the furniture designer than just physical comfort: the well-being and comfort of the spirit. Rietveld and his colleagues in the de Stijl art and architecture movement sought to create a utopia based on a harmonic human-made order, which they believed could renew Europe after the devastating turmoil of World War I. New forms, in their view, were essential to this rebuilding.

Publication excerpt from The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA Highlights, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, revised 2004, originally published 1999, p. 86

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