Mihály Biró. 1919 Május 1. 1919

Mihály Biró 1919 Május 1 1919

  • Not on view

This version of Biró's Red Man with a Hammer was one of many produced during the tumult of Hungary’s 1919 revolution. The poster advertised May Day celebrations, a holiday associated with the international worker's movement; it would be the biggest public event during the 133 days of the short-lived Hungarian Soviet Republic. Embodying the energy of the revolutionary masses, Biró's red man glorified the common worker as the equivalent of mythological figures Hercules, or Vulcan at his forge. The concept of posters as public decorations for May Day was at least partly inspired by Soviet Russian precedents. "The defiant simplicity, the removal of peripheral things, and the menacing power of the delivery—all these are the hallmarks of Biró," wrote the critic Pál Nadái at the time.

Gallery label from Seeing Red: Hungarian Revolutionary Posters, 1919, February 2–August 1, 2011.
Medium
Lithograph
Dimensions
49 5/8 x 37 3/8" (126 x 95 cm)
Credit
Gift of Joseph H. Heil, by exchange
Object number
137.2010
Department
Architecture and Design

Installation views

How we identified these works

In 2018–19, MoMA collaborated with Google Arts & Culture Lab on a project using machine learning to identify artworks in installation photos. That project has concluded, and works are now being identified by MoMA staff.

If you notice an error, please contact us at [email protected].

Licensing

If you would like to reproduce an image of a work of art in MoMA’s collection, or an image of a MoMA publication or archival material (including installation views, checklists, and press releases), please contact Art Resource (publication in North America) or Scala Archives (publication in all other geographic locations).

MoMA licenses archival audio and select out of copyright film clips from our film collection. At this time, MoMA produced video cannot be licensed by MoMA/Scala. All requests to license archival audio or out of copyright film clips should be addressed to Scala Archives at [email protected]. Motion picture film stills cannot be licensed by MoMA/Scala. For access to motion picture film stills for research purposes, please contact the Film Study Center at [email protected]. For more information about film loans and our Circulating Film and Video Library, please visit https://www.moma.org/research-and-learning/circulating-film.

If you would like to reproduce text from a MoMA publication, please email [email protected]. If you would like to publish text from MoMA’s archival materials, please fill out this permission form and send to [email protected].

Feedback

This record is a work in progress. If you have additional information or spotted an error, please send feedback to [email protected].