Carolyn Lazard. CRIP TIME. 2018. Video (color, sound), 10 min. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Fund for the Twenty-First Century. © 2022 Carolyn Lazard Artist-provided description: In this video still, a set of hands sort seven pillbox compartments on an embroidered tablecloth. The image is taken from an overhead position with the hands partially obstructing the view of the differently colored compartments. The compartments are yellow, blue, pink, green, and white. They are filled with differently colored pills, too. There is a patch of bright sunlight on the tablecloth and there are a few pill bottles barely visible along the edge of the frame. Bright orange pills are held in the palm of one hand.

Disability Art Chats provide a community space for folks who identify as disabled, crip, MAD, and/or C/S/X, and those allied with the principles of disability justice. During this free, 90-minute online program, we use a crip perspective to unearth fresh interpretations of MoMA’s collection and foster friendship through creative discussion. Together, we learn from and about the impact of modern artistry on disabled experiences, and vice versa. Each session focuses on a topic specifically connected to a guest speaker. No specialized understanding of art, art history, or crip theory is required.

Images and descriptions of works to be discussed will be sent to registered participants prior to the programs. Sessions will include verbal description, live captioning, ASL interpretation, and a virtual quiet room. Participants can request any additional accommodations, or let us know how we can best support their full participation in this program by emailing or calling our department.

To receive updates about upcoming Disability Art Chats programs, fill out our contact form.

For more information, email [email protected] or call Access Programs at 212-408-6447.

Artist-provided description: In this video still, a set of hands sort seven pillbox compartments on an embroidered tablecloth. The image is taken from an overhead position with the hands partially obstructing the view of the differently colored compartments. The compartments are yellow, blue, pink, green, and white. They are filled with differently colored pills too. There is a patch of bright sunlight on the tablecloth and there are a few pill bottles barely visible along the edge of the frame. Bright orange pills are held in the palm of one hand.

The Adobe Foundation is proud to support equity, learning, and creativity at MoMA.

Access and Community Programs are supported by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF).

Major funding is provided by Volkswagen of America, The Taft Foundation, and by the Werner and Elaine Dannheisser Fund for Older Adults at MoMA in honor of Agnes Gund.

Additional support is provided by the Sarah K. de Coizart Article TENTH Perpetual Charitable Trust, the Allene Reuss Memorial Trust, the J.E. and Z.B. Butler Foundation, the Megara Foundation, The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., the Von Seebeck-Share B Charitable Trust, The Elroy and Terry Krumholz Foundation, and the Annual Education Fund.