Introduction
Marcel Lajos Breuer ( BROY-ər; 21 May 1902 – 1 July 1981), was a Hungarian-born modernist architect, and furniture designer. At the Bauhaus he designed the Wassily Chair and the Cesca Chair which is “among the 10 most important chairs of the 20th century.” Breuer extended the sculptural vocabulary he had developed in the carpentry shop at the Bauhaus into a personal architecture that made him one of the world's most popular architects at the peak of 20th-century design. His work includes art museums, libraries, college buildings, and residences. Many are in a Brutalist architecture style.
Wikidata
Q57588
Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Introduction
In the 1920s, Breuer led the carpentry workshop at the Bauhaus, designing innovative modern furniture which rejected formalism and ornamentation, including the cantilevered chair and his famous 'Wassily' chair. From 1928 to 1931 he worked on architectural projects for Walter Gropius. He emigrated to the United States in 1937 and became a professor at Harvard University. While at Harvard, he and Gropius formed a partnership designing buildings that were influenced by New England vernacular architecture. From 1963 to 1966, Breuer designed the Whitney Museum of American Art. American architect and designer, born in Hungary, studied in Germany, in U.S. since 1937.
Nationalities
American, Hungarian
Gender
Male
Roles
Artist, Architect, Designer, Furniture Designer
Names
Marcel Breuer, Marcel L. Breuer, Marcel Lajos Breuer
Ulan
500118800
Information from Getty’s Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License

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