Wikipedia entry
Introduction
Dame Zaha Mohammad Hadid (Arabic: زها حديد‎ Zahā Ḥadīd; 31 October 1950 – 31 March 2016) was a British Iraqi architect, artist and designer, recognised as a major figure in architecture of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Born in Baghdad, Iraq, Hadid studied mathematics as an undergraduate and then enrolled at the Architectural Association School of Architecture in 1972. In search of an alternative system to traditional architectural drawing, and influenced by Suprematism and the Russian avant-garde, Hadid adopted painting as a design tool and abstraction as an investigative principle to "reinvestigate the aborted and untested experiments of Modernism [...] to unveil new fields of building."She was described by The Guardian as the "Queen of the curve", who "liberated architectural geometry, giving it a whole new expressive identity". Her major works include the London Aquatics Centre for the 2012 Olympics, the Broad Art Museum, Rome's MAXXI Museum, and the Guangzhou Opera House. Some of her awards have been presented posthumously, including the statuette for the 2017 Brit Awards. Several of her buildings were still under construction at the time of her death, including the Daxing International Airport in Beijing, and the Al Wakrah Stadium in Qatar, a venue for the 2022 FIFA World Cup.Hadid was the first woman to receive the Pritzker Architecture Prize, in 2004. She received the UK's most prestigious architectural award, the Stirling Prize, in 2010 and 2011. In 2012, she was made a Dame by Elizabeth II for services to architecture, and in February, 2016, the month preceding her death, she became the first woman to be individually awarded the Royal Gold Medal from the Royal Institute of British Architects (Ray Eames and Sheila O'Donnell had previously been awarded it jointly with Charles Eames and John Tuomey respectively).
Wikidata
Q47780
Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Getty record
Introduction
Born in Iraq, Hadid attended boarding schools in Europe from the age of 16. From 1972 she trained at the Architectural Association in London, with Elia Zenghelis and Rem Koolhaas. In 1994 she won a competition for the Cardiff Bay Opera House in Cardiff, Wales. She began her own practice in 1979, but realized no built works until 1994 with the Vitra Fire Station in Weil am Rhein, Germany. Known for the dynamic, sculptural, and complex forms of her built works, she was the first woman to win the Pritzker Prize (2004). She was also the first woman to win Britain’s Royal Gold Medal when she was named the 2016 recipient.
Nationalities
British, English, Iraqi
Gender
Female
Roles
Artist, Architect, Designer, Teacher
Names
Zaha Hadid, Zaha M. Hadid
Ulan
500011138
Information from Getty’s Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License

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