• MoMA, Floor 2, 216

Is it possible to design a house, a neighborhood, or even an entire nation that creates a sense of belonging for all its inhabitants? From the design of a single-family home to the development of large-scale public housing, architects have long sought to address the needs of diverse sets of individuals—generating new ideas about the ways spaces are occupied, how buildings are visualized, and the materials with which they are fabricated.

Architecture is one way of expressing complex—and at times controversial—civic values. During the societal upheavals of the 1960s, architects and urban planners had a profound role in shaping how populations lived. Yet friction between architects’ visions and their clients’ needs at times resulted in the construction of buildings that, while initially critically acclaimed, ultimately failed. Spanning the 1970s to the present, the works in this gallery consider architecture’s capacity to give shape to the social, political, and cultural dimensions of our communities and the worlds they inhabit.

20 works online

Artists

Installation images

How we identified these works

In 2018–19, MoMA collaborated with Google Arts & Culture Lab on a project using machine learning to identify artworks in installation photos. That project has concluded, and works are now being identified by MoMA staff.

If you notice an error, please contact us at [email protected].

Licensing

If you would like to reproduce an image of a work of art in MoMA’s collection, or an image of a MoMA publication or archival material (including installation views, checklists, and press releases), please contact Art Resource (publication in North America) or Scala Archives (publication in all other geographic locations).

MoMA licenses archival audio and select out of copyright film clips from our film collection. At this time, MoMA produced video cannot be licensed by MoMA/Scala. All requests to license archival audio or out of copyright film clips should be addressed to Scala Archives at [email protected]. Motion picture film stills cannot be licensed by MoMA/Scala. For access to motion picture film stills for research purposes, please contact the Film Study Center at [email protected]. For more information about film loans and our Circulating Film and Video Library, please visit https://www.moma.org/research-and-learning/circulating-film.

If you would like to reproduce text from a MoMA publication, please email [email protected]. If you would like to publish text from MoMA’s archival materials, please fill out this permission form and send to [email protected].

Feedback

This record is a work in progress. If you have additional information or spotted an error, please send feedback to [email protected].