Wikipedia entry
Introduction
Jim Dine (born 16 June 1935 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a contemporary artist whose œuvre extends over sixty years. Dine’s exceptionally diverse practice includes painting, drawing, printmaking (in many forms including lithographs, etchings, gravure, intaglio, woodcuts, letterpress and linocuts), sculpture and photography; his early works encompassed assemblage and happenings, while in recent years his poetry output, both in publications and readings, has increased. Dine has been associated with numerous art movements throughout his career including Neo-Dada (use of collage and found objects), Abstract Expressionism (the gestural nature of his painting), and Pop Art (affixing everyday objects including tools, rope, articles of clothing and even a bathroom sink) to his canvases, yet he has actively avoided such classifications. At the core of his art, regardless of the medium of the specific work, lies an intense process of autobiographical reflection, a relentless exploration and criticism of the self through a number of highly personal motifs which include: the heart, the bathrobe, tools, antique sculpture, and the character of Pinocchio (among flora, skulls, birds and figurative self-portraits). Dine’s approach is all-encompassing, incorporating his entire lived experience: “Dine’s art has a stream of consciousness quality to its evolution, and is based on all aspects of his life—what he is reading, objects he comes upon in souvenir shops around the world, a serious study of art from every time and place that he understands as being useful to his own practice.” Dine’s art has been the subject of more than 300 solo exhibitions, including retrospectives at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (1970), the Museum of Modern Art, New York (1978), Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (1984–85), Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park, Grand Rapids, Michigan (2011) and Museum Folkwang, Essen (2015–16). His work is held in permanent collections including the Art Institute of Chicago; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre Pompidou, Paris; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Tate Gallery, London; Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum, Tokyo; and Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut. Dine’s distinctions include his nomination as a member of the Academy of Arts and Letters in New York (1980), Commandeur de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres (2003), the British Museum Medal (2015) following his donation of 234 prints to the museum in 2014, membership of the Accademia di San Luca in Rome (2017), and Chevalier de l’Ordre de la Légion d’Honneur (2018).
Wikidata
Q531234
Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Getty record
Introduction
Dine, a prolific artist, came to prominence in New York from 1959-1960 when he staged a series of "Happenings", creating action painting and assemblages. His works often repeat a visual theme (hearts) or frequently utilize objects (shoes, toothbrushes), throughout different mediums. Although he used objects from everyday life, he was not a Pop Artist, though he was not a pure abstractionist. By the 80s, he was considered a forerunner of the Neo-Expressionist movement. American artist.
Nationality
American
Gender
Male
Roles
Artist, Poet, Illustrator, Painter, Performance Artist, Sculptor
Names
Jim Dine, James Dine
Ulan
500028463
Information from Getty’s Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License
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