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December 6, 2013  |  Film, Publications,
Lessons from The Berlin School
Cover of The Berlin School: Films from the Berliner Schule

Cover of The Berlin School: Films from the Berliner Schule

Beginning in the mid-1990s, a loose affiliation of filmmakers, graduates of the German Film and Television Academy in Berlin, began creating films that offered a new, aesthetically-driven form of cinema.

September 9, 2013  |  Intern Chronicles,
More Chaos, Please: Dutch Teen Programs at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam and Showroom MAMA
Blikopeners, Photo: Tomek Whitfield

Blikopeners, Photo: Tomek Whitfield

It is possible there is no cooler place to be an artsy young person than in the Netherlands. Were you curating art spaces in famous modern and contemporary art museums when you were 17? Or designing tours and educational programs at galleries? I sure wasn’t. But the teenagers with whom I met while on a professional development trip to the Netherlands are doing just that.

Robin's photo on the wall in the Blikopener Spot

Robin’s photo on the wall in the Blikopener Spot

Robin is a Blikopener at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. As he and I walked around the museum, Robin explained to me that the Blikopeners (“Eye Openers”) are a group of teens at the museum who give tours to the general public and who run the Blikopener Spot, a gallery and educational space on the lower level of the new museum building. Marlous van Gastel, who oversees the program for the education department, looks for a variety of teens: outspoken leaders, quiet creative types, knowledgeable art historians. After attending interactive training sessions, the Blikopeners give tours of the museum in pairs. Robin studies art history and knows a lot about the works of art, so he likes to partner with people who are good at asking fruitful questions and engaging audiences in close looking. These Blikopeners never get bored—they can develop new tours and pick new partners, and they work with the curatorial and conservation departments to choose artworks for the Blikopener Spot.

They also partner with other teen programs across the Netherlands. I traveled to Rotterdam to meet with some of the people with whom they’ve collaborated at Showroom MAMA, a contemporary art center by and for young artists. MAMA has about 30 Rookies, young people ages 16-26 who work on all aspects of the center’s operations. Recruited and trained by Margriet Brouwer, the Rookies design exhibitions, develop educational programs, assist visiting artists, raise funds, and more. Bram, a Rookie and current intern (meaning he’s time-based, not project-based), oversees the MAMA Rocks Around website, a resource for Rookies who give tours of the center’s exhibitions to school groups. The website is in Dutch, but he explained to me that it includes suggestions for interactive activities (e.g. If the person in this artwork had a Facebook page, what would it look like? What would be this character’s online persona?) and other tricks of the trade. The management and development of this website is handed off to a new intern every few months to ensure that many Rookies get a chance to spearhead such a project.

From left to right: Martine, myself, Margriet, Bram, Lara, Yaël

From left to right: Martine, myself, Margriet, Bram, Lara, Yaël

Showroom MAMA also runs a Rookies Junior program, the first iteration of which began as MAMA’s All Girls Street Art Collective, a group which has since evolved into an independent artists’ collective called ONSKRUID. They were commissioned to create a six-meter high wall for the Kunsthal Rotterdam exhibition The Fashion World of Jean-Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk, and in July they led a workshop at the Museum of Contemporary Aboriginal Art in Utrecht. I met with two of these nine young women, Lara and Yaël, who blew me away with their talent, confidence, and general awesomeness.

Artwork by Lara, Photo: Lotte Stekelenburg

Artwork by Lara, Photo: Lotte Stekelenburg

Lara first approached the Collective as a writer unfamiliar with street art but eager for a creative outlet. Under the leadership of Martine Poot, the Collective explored street art around the Netherlands, met with female street artists, and created art collectively and independently. Each member came up with her own signature style. Staying true to her roots as a writer, Lara bases her artwork around words. Her tagline of choice? “More chaos please.” The Collective’s artworks were shown last spring at Showroom MAMA—a remarkable exhibition due to the quality of the artworks and the fact that all the artists were younger than 18.

These teens at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam and Showroom MAMA and the supportive staff who run these programs are changing the face of the Dutch contemporary art scene for the better. Art should not sit passively by in stuffy institutions. It should inspire and empower. Art should be in the hands and minds of the interested, the creative, and the young. Lara said it well: more chaos, please.

Introducing Young Frank, Architect
Cover of <i>Young Frank, Architect</i>

Cover of Young Frank, Architect, published by The Museum of Modern Art

Young Frank, Architect, MoMA’s first storybook for kids ages three to eight, follows the adventures of Young Frank, a resourceful young architect who lives in New York City with his grandfather, Old Frank, who is also an architect. Young Frank sees creative possibilities everywhere, and likes to use anything he can get his hands on—macaroni, old boxes, spoons, and sometimes even his dog, Eddie—to creates things like chairs out of toilet paper rolls and twisting skyscrapers made up of his grandfather’s books. But Old Frank is skeptical; he doesn’t think that’s how REAL architects make things.

One day, donning matching bow ties, straw boater hats, and Le Corbusier-inspired glasses, they visit The Museum of Modern Art, where they see the work of renowned architects like Frank Gehry and Frank Lloyd Wright. And they learn that real architects do in fact create wiggly chairs, twisty towers, and even entire cities. Inspired by what they see, Young Frank and Old Frank return home to build structures of every shape and size: “tall ones, fat ones, round ones, and one made from chocolate chip cookies.”

Spread from <i>Young Frank, Architect</i>

Spread from Young Frank, Architect

Spread from <i>Young Frank, Architect</i>

Spread from Young Frank, Architect

Spread from <i>Young Frank, Architect</i>

Spread from Young Frank, Architect

Written by award-winning children’s author and illustrator Frank Viva, a frequent cover artist for The New Yorker whose previous books include Along A Long Road and A Long Way Away, Young Frank, Architect is an inspiration for budding architects as well as a lesson for those who think they’ve seen everything. With its rich color palette of grays, olives, ambers, and cream (it’s printed using nine colors instead of the usual four), it’s a great introduction to MoMA’s diverse architecture and design collection, which includes surprising objects like Arthur Young’s helicopter in addition to furniture and architectural models.

Young Frank, Architect is a MoMA Exclusive for the month of August, meaning it’s available only at the MoMA Stores now through its wide release in September. Snag a copy and spend the dog-days of August exploring architecture. What will it inspire you to build?

To see more of Young Frank’s adventure, check out our video book trailer below.

June 2, 2011  | 
Under Construction
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. Morris Greenwald House, Weston, Connecticut, Floor plan

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. Morris Greenwald House, Weston, Connecticut, Floor plan. 1955. Colored pencil on blueprint, 24 x 42 1/2" (61 x 108 cm). Mies van der Rohe Archive, gift of the architect. © 2011 The Museum of Modern Art, New York

We’re taking a short break from posting while we perform some site upgrades. </p>

Check back on Monday for new content and a new look for the Inside/Out homepage.</b>

September 3, 2010  | 
We’re Off to the Beach!
Joel Sternfeld. Little Talbot Beach, Florida. September 1980. Chromogenic color print, printed 1980, 13 9/16 x 16 15/16" (34.5 x 43.1 cm). Gift of Beth Goldberg Nash and Joshua Nash. © 2010 Joel Sternfeld

Joel Sternfeld. Little Talbot Beach, Florida. September 1980. Chromogenic color print, printed 1980, 13 9/16 x 16 15/16\

INSIDE/OUT is bidding summer a fond farewell by taking advantage of the long holiday weekend. We’ll be back, rested and refreshed, on Tuesday, September 7.

From the entire INSIDE/OUT team, have a wonderful holiday!

July 22, 2010  | 
The Strange and Wonderful World of Tabaimo

In my admittedly limited experience, Venice in the summer is hot—water-guzzling, gelato-melting, desperate-for-shade hot—not unlike what we’ve experienced here in New York over the last several weeks. In the summer of 2007, as I dashed between air-conditioned venues at the Venice Biennale, I remember the relief I felt at finding myself in a cool, dark space inside an exhibition hall. I remember equally clearly the work that was on view there, a video, dolefullhouse, by the young Japanese artist Tabaimo.

January 12, 2010  |  Rising Currents,
Rising Currents: From Workshop to Exhibition

Rising Currents enticed hundreds of visitors to brave the cold and spend their weekend at P.S.1’s Saturday Sessions, exploring the Rising Currents open studios and listening to the architects-in-residence present their design solutions for New York’s rising sea level. The open house marked the official conclusion of the first phase of the Rising Currents project, the eight-week architect-in-residence workshop. Working together with MoMA’s Exhibition Design, Graphics, and Architecture and Design departments, the five multidisciplinary teams now move their projects forward by determining how best to transfer the results of their P.S.1 workshop processes into engaging design presentations within the context of a MoMA gallery. Below, the teams report on their final week in the workshop.  A video of the presentations will be available on the Rising Currents website www.moma.org/risingcurrents soon.

Eric Bunge and Mimi Hoang, nARCHITECTS
ZONE 3:

January 1, 2010  | 
Happy New Year
Andreas Gursky. New Year's Day Swimmers. 1988

Andreas Gursky. New Year's Day Swimmers. 1988

As we ring in the new year, we’d like to wish you a very happy and healthy 2010 and thank you for all of your support, interest, and encouragement since we started this blog two months ago. We hope you enjoy this series of blog posts featuring winter- and New Year’s–themed works from MoMA’s collection.

December 31, 2009  | 
2010 – One Day Left

As we prepare to ring in the new year, we’d like to wish you a very happy and healthy 2010 and thank you for all of your support, interest, and encouragement since we started this blog two months ago. We hope you enjoy this series of blog posts featuring winter- and New Year’s–themed works from MoMA’s collection.

Tod Papageorge. New Years Eve at Studio 54. 1978

Tod Papageorge. New Year's Eve at Studio 54. 1978

December 30, 2009  | 
2010 – Two Days Left
Wes Wilson (Robert Wesley Wilson). New Year Bash. 1966

Wes Wilson (Robert Wesley Wilson). New Year Bash. 1966

As we prepare to ring in the new year, we’d like to wish you a very happy and healthy 2010 and thank you for all of your support, interest, and encouragement since we started this blog two months ago. We hope you enjoy this series of blog posts featuring winter- and New Year’s–themed works from MoMA’s collection.