Harry Gordon Poster Dress 1967

  • Not on view

For as little as three dollars, this dress allowed teenage fans to parade their allegiance to a pop icon and was easily disposable after the novelty wore off. “Toughness is woven into the non–woven fabric for long, l–o–n–g wear,” read the packaging, “and should you tire (which is doubtful), just cut open all the seams and hang it on your wall as a poster, or cover pillows.” Although they were treated for fire– and water–resistance and were surprisingly sturdy, paper dresses required wearers to be constantly on guard against lit cigarettes and spilled drinks. By 1969 the short–lived paper–dress craze was all but over.

Gallery label from Designing Modern Women 1890–1990, October 5, 2013–October 1, 2014.

For as little as three dollars this dress allowed teenage fans to parade their allegiance to a pop icon and was easily disposed of after the novelty wore off. "Toughness is woven into the non-woven fabric for long, l-o-n-g wear," read the packaging, "and should you tire (which is doubtful), just cut open all the seams and hang it on your wall as a poster, or cover pillows." Although they were treated for fire- and water-resistance and surprisingly sturdy, paper dresses still required wearers to be on guard against lit cigarettes and spilled drinks.

Gallery label from From the Collection: 1960-69, March 26, 2016 - March 12, 2017.
Medium
Screenprinted tissue, wood pulp, and rayon mesh
Dimensions
34 x 24" (86.4 x 61 cm)
Credit
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Farland
Object number
2258.1967
Department
Architecture and Design

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