Henri Matisse. Woman on a High Stool (Germaine Raynal). Paris, quai Saint-Michel, early 1914

Henri Matisse Woman on a High Stool (Germaine Raynal) Paris, quai Saint-Michel, early 1914

  • Not on view

Matisse took Woman on a High Stool through many changes as he worked, particularly the seated figure. Perhaps the greatest alteration was in color: vivid blue, green, and orange-red areas have been mostly covered with layers of gray. Here, as in his earlier blue paintings, the artist may have embraced a restriction of color for the formal and expressive potential it presented. The painting shares its simplified geometric forms, heavy contouring, and austere palette with the work of Cézanne and Cubist paintings Picasso and Georges Braque made a few years earlier. This work represents Germaine Raynal, wife of the Cubist critic Maurice Raynal.

Gallery label from Matisse: Radical Invention, 1913-1917, July 18–October 11, 2010.

Matisse took Woman on a High Stool (Germaine Raynal) through many changes as he worked, particularly the seated figure. Perhaps the greatest alteration was in color: vivid blue, green, and orange-red areas have been mostly covered with layers of gray. The painting shares its simplified geometric forms, heavy contouring, and austere palette with the work of Paul Cézanne and the Cubist paintings Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque made a few years earlier.

Gallery label from 2011.
Medium
Oil on canvas
Dimensions
57 7/8 x 37 5/8" (147 x 95.5 cm)
Credit
Gift and bequest of Florene M. Schoenborn and Samuel A. Marx
Object number
506.1964
Copyright
© 2019 Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Department
Painting and Sculpture

Installation views

MoMA collaborated with Google Arts & Culture Lab on a project using machine learning to identify artworks in installation photos.

If you notice an error, please contact us at digital@moma.org.

This work is included in the Provenance Research Project, which investigates the ownership history of works in MoMA's collection.

Reserved for Sergei Shchukin, 1914, but never delivered to Moscow because of outbreak of WWI
The artist, 1914 - 1954
Artist's estate / Madame Amélie Matisse, 1954 - 1958
Purchased from Amélie Matisse through Contemporary Art Establishment, Vaduz, Liechtenstein / Heinz Berggruen, Zurich, by Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Marx, Chicago; then Florene May Schoenborn (Samuel A. Marx's widow, later Mrs. Wolfgang Schoenborn). March 1958 (promised gift to MoMA in 1958) - 1964
The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift and bequest of Florene M. Schoenborn and Samuel A. Marx, 1964

Provenance research is a work in progress, and is frequently updated with new information. If you have any questions or information to provide about the listed works, please email provenance@moma.org or write to:

Provenance Research Project
The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York, NY 10019

If you would like to reproduce an image of a work of art in MoMA’s collection, or an image of a MoMA publication or archival material (including installation views, checklists, and press releases), please contact Art Resource (publication in North America) or Scala Archives (publication in all other geographic locations).

All requests to license audio or video footage produced by MoMA should be addressed to Scala Archives at firenze@scalarchives.com. Motion picture film stills or motion picture footage from films in MoMA's Film Collection cannot be licensed by MoMA/Scala. For licensing motion picture film footage it is advised to apply directly to the copyright holders. For access to motion picture film stills please contact the Film Study Center. More information is also available about the film collection and the Circulating Film and Video Library.

If you would like to reproduce text from a MoMA publication or moma.org, please email text_permissions@moma.org. If you would like to publish text from MoMA’s archival materials, please fill out this permission form and send to archives@moma.org.

This record is a work in progress. If you have additional information or spotted an error, please send feedback to digital@moma.org.