Joan Mitchell. Ladybug. 1957

Joan Mitchell Ladybug 1957

  • Not on view

In Ladybug, Mitchell abuts pure colors with colors that mix on the canvas, dense paint with liquid drips, flatness with relief. White patches of pigment aerate the energized fields of color. Although Mitchell was considered one of the principal figures of the second generation of Abstract Expressionists that emerged in the mid-1950s, she also challenged the conventional wisdom of the New York School. While her paintings are abstract, their starting point was nature, which she set out not to describe but "to paint what it leaves me with."

Gallery label from Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction, April 19 - August 13, 2017.

The formal structure of Mitchell's paintings, and their physical quality and sense of process, are extensions of Abstract Expressionism, but in some respects Mitchell challenged the conventional wisdom of the New York School. (She also left New York, joining Sam Francis and others of her generation in Paris.) Abstract though her paintings are, she saw them as dealing with nature—with the outside world, that is, rather than the inner one. In fact she shunned self-expression as such; her work, she said, was "about landscape, not about me." Nor did she consider herself an "action painter," since she worked more from thought than from instinct. "The freedom in my work is quite controlled," Mitchell said, "I don't close my eyes and hope for the best." Ladybug abuts pure colors with colors that mix on the canvas, dense paint with liquid drips, flatness with relief. Empty areas at the work's edges suggest a basic ground, which seems to continue under the tracery of color; but the white patches here are actually more pigment, and shift in intensity and texture. Struggling out between short, firm, jaggedly arranged strokes of blue, mauve, green, brown, and red, the whites aerate this energized structure, appearing ambiguously both under and over it. No landscape is evident; Mitchell set out not to describe nature but "to paint what it leaves me with." Ladybug. 1957

Publication excerpt from The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA Highlights, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, revised 2004, originally published 1999, p. 225.
Medium
Oil on canvas
Dimensions
6' 5 7/8" x 9' (197.9 x 274 cm)
Credit
Purchase
Object number
385.1961
Copyright
© Estate of Joan Mitchell
Department
Painting and Sculpture

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