Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. Barcelona Chair. 1929

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

Barcelona Chair

1929

Manufacturer
Knoll International, Inc., New York, NY
Medium
Stainless-steel bars and leather upholsteryf
Dimensions
31 x 29 3/8 x 30" (78.7 x 74.6 x 76.2 cm)
Credit
Gift of the manufacturer
Object number
552.1953
Copyright
© 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn
Department
Architecture and Design
This work is not on view.
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe has 1,729 works online.
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The Barcelona Chair achieves the serenity of line and the refinement of proportions and materials characteristic of Mies van der Rohe's highly disciplined architecture. It is supported on each side by two chrome-plated, flat steel bars. Seen from the side, the single curve of the bar forming the chair's back and front legs crosses the S-curve of the bar forming the seat and back legs, making an intersection of the two. This simple shape derives from a long history of precedents, from ancient Egyptian folding stools to nineteenth-century neoclassical seating. The cantilevered seat and the back of the original chairs were upholstered in white kid leather with welt and button details.

Mies van der Rohe designed this chair for his German Pavilion at the Barcelona Exposition of 1929. The Pavilion was the site of the inaugural ceremony for the German exhibits at the exposition, and the Spanish king was to preside. It had to be an "important chair, a very elegant chair," according to the architect. "The government was to receive a king. . . . The chair had to be . . . monumental. In those circumstances, you just couldn't use a kitchen chair."

Although only two Barcelona chairs were made for the German Pavilion, the design was put into production and became so popular that, with the exception of one sixteen-year period, it has been manufactured since 1929.

Barcelona Chair. 1929

Publication excerpt from The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA Highlights, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, revised 2004, originally published 1999, p. 120

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