Richard Sapper. Tizio Table Lamp. 1971

Richard Sapper Tizio Table Lamp 1971

  • Not on view

Sapper claimed that he designed the Tizio lamp because he could not find a work lamp that suited him: "I wanted a small head and long arms; I didn't want to have to clamp the lamp to the desk because it's awkward. And I wanted to be able to move it easily." The designer's dream lamp, the Tizio is an adjustable table fixture that can be moved in four directions. It swivels smoothly and can be set in any position, its balance ensured by a system of counterweights. The halogen bulb, adjustable to two different light intensities, is fed through the arm from a transformer concealed in the base. In 1972, when the Tizio lamp was first produced, the use of the arms to conduct electricity was an innovation seen in few other lamp designs.

From a formal point of view, the Tizio lamp was revolutionary. Black, angled, minimalist, and mysterious, the lamp achieved its real commercial success in the early 1980s, when its sleek look met the Wall Street boom. Found in the residences of the young and successful and in the offices of executives, the lamp has become an icon of high-tech design.

Tizio Table Lamp. 1971

Publication excerpt from The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA Highlights, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, revised 2004, originally published 1999, p. 292.
Manufacturer
Artemide S.p.A., Milan, Italy
Medium
ABS plastic, aluminum, and other materials
Dimensions
46 3/4 x 42 1/2 (118.7 x 108 cm); 4 1/4 (10.8 cm) diam. at base
Credit
Gift of the manufacturer
Object number
198.1973
Copyright
© 2018 Richard Sapper
Department
Architecture and Design

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