Projects 103: Thea Djordjadze

Apr 3–Aug 28, 2016

MoMA PS1

Installation view of Projects 103: Thea Djordjadze. 2016. Photo: Pablo Enriquez

Projects 103, the first exhibition in the forty-five year history of the Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series to take place a MoMA PS1, presents a site-specific sculpture by the Berlin-based, Georgian artist Thea Djordjadze. Drawing on the visual language of architecture and functional design, Djordjadze creates sculptural environments that foreground the lasting legacy of Modernism while evoking the vernacular and folk traditions native to the Caucasus region in the Republic of Georgia. For MoMA PS1, she will build a large-scale sculptural installation made especially for the museum’s ground floor, brick-walled, duplex gallery. Responding to the room’s exaggerated ceiling height, the work is inspired by a 12th century pharmacy located in the cave city of Vardzia, Georgia, pictured in a poster that hung in the artist’s childhood bedroom.

Projects 103: Thea Djordjadze will be the artist’s first solo presentation in New York. Thea Djordjadze (Tbilisi, Georgia, 1971) has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions at institutions including MIT List Visual Arts Center, Massachusetts (2014); the Aspen Art Museum, Colorado (2013); Malmo Konsthall, Malmo, Sweden (2012); and the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri (2011). She has participated in the 56th Venice Biennale (2015), the 55th Venice Biennale (2013) and Documenta 13 (2012). Djordjadze lives and works in Berlin, Germany.

Organized by Paulina Pobocha, Assistant Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art, with Margaret Aldredge, Curatorial Assistant, MoMA PS1.

  • This exhibition is part of The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series.
  • The Elaine Dannheisser Projects Series is made possible in part by The Elaine Dannheisser Foundation and The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art. Additional generous support for this exhibition is provided by Dayana Tamendarova.

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