Andy Warhol: Campbell’s Soup Cans and Other Works, 1953–1967

Apr 25–Oct 18, 2015

MoMA

Andy Warhol (American, 1928–1987). Campbell’s Soup Cans (detail). 1962. Synthetic polymer paint on 32 canvases, each 20 × 16″ (50.8 × 40.6 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Partial gift of Irving Blum. Additional funding provided by Nelson A. Rockefeller Bequest, gift of Mr. and Mrs. William A.M. Burden, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Fund, gift of Nina and Gordon Bunshaft in honor of Henry Moore, Lillie P. Bliss Bequest, Philip Johnson Fund, Frances R. Keech Bequest, gift of Mrs. Bliss Parkinson, and Florence B. Wesley Bequest (all by exchange)
  • MoMA, Floor 2, Exhibition Galleries The Paul J. Sachs Prints and Illustrated Books Galleries

Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup Cans is the signature work in the artist’s career and a landmark in MoMA’s collection. The 1962 series of 32 paintings is the centerpiece in this focused collection exhibition of Warhol’s work during the crucial years between 1953 and 1967. The Soup Cans mark a breakthrough for Warhol, when he began to apply his seminal strategies of serial repetition and reproduction to key subjects derived from American commodity culture. Warhol also developed his signature use of the flat, uniform aesthetic of photo-screenprinting just after he completed the Soup Cans. For the first time at MoMA, the 32 Soup Cans are shown in a line (rather than a grid), echoing the way they were first exhibited at the Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles, in 1962. The exhibition also includes drawings and illustrated books Warhol made in the 1950s, when he started his career as a commercial artist, and other paintings and prints from the 1960s, when he became a beacon of the Pop art movement.

View visitors’ Warhol-inspired artworks on the #MyWarhol Tagboard

Organized by Starr Figura, Curator, with Hillary Reder, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

The exhibition is supported by the MoMA Annual Exhibition Fund.

Publications

Artists

Installation images

How we identified these works

In 2018–19, MoMA collaborated with Google Arts & Culture Lab on a project using machine learning to identify artworks in installation photos. That project has concluded, and works are now being identified by MoMA staff.

If you notice an error, please contact us at [email protected].

Licensing

If you would like to reproduce an image of a work of art in MoMA’s collection, or an image of a MoMA publication or archival material (including installation views, checklists, and press releases), please contact Art Resource (publication in North America) or Scala Archives (publication in all other geographic locations).

MoMA licenses archival audio and select out of copyright film clips from our film collection. At this time, MoMA produced video cannot be licensed by MoMA/Scala. All requests to license archival audio or out of copyright film clips should be addressed to Scala Archives at [email protected]. Motion picture film stills cannot be licensed by MoMA/Scala. For access to motion picture film stills for research purposes, please contact the Film Study Center at [email protected]. For more information about film loans and our Circulating Film and Video Library, please visit https://www.moma.org/research-and-learning/circulating-film.

If you would like to reproduce text from a MoMA publication, please email [email protected]. If you would like to publish text from MoMA’s archival materials, please fill out this permission form and send to [email protected].

Feedback

This record is a work in progress. If you have additional information or spotted an error, please send feedback to [email protected].