“This is the way your leverage lies”: The Seth Siegelaub Papers as Institutional Critique

Jan 9–Mar 4, 2013

MoMA

Installation view of “This is the way your leverage lies”: The Seth Siegelaub Papers as Institutional Critique at The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: Jonathan Muzikar
  • Education Center The Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Education and Research Building

The Seth Siegelaub Papers document the activities of Seth Siegelaub, a gallery owner, independent curator, publisher, event facilitator, and seminal figure in the Conceptual art movement of the 1960s and 1970s. Siegelaub organized twenty-one exhibitions, publications, and projects in North America and Europe between February 1968 and July 1971, working closely with artists such as Carl Andre, Robert Barry, Douglas Huebler, Joseph Kosuth, and Lawrence Weiner in a wide range of innovative formats, before largely withdrawing from the art world in 1972. His curatorial work took place both in physical spaces and, most significantly, in the form of books, in which he re-defined the exhibition catalogue itself as the exhibition. Siegelaub’s approach mirrored the Conceptual art movement by raising important questions about the making, display, ownership, distribution, and selling of works of art. This exhibition will highlight examples from the Papers that illustrate Siegelaub’s role in helping to re-empower artists in the hierarchical art world of the 1960s and 1970s, and will feature projects such as the Xerox Book, the Art Workers’ Coalition, the Public Press + News Network, the Artist’s Reserved Rights Transfer and Sale Agreement, and the January 5–31, 1969 show.

Organized by Christiana Dobrzynski Grippe, Project Archivist, Museum Archives.

Funding for the processing of the Seth Siegelaub Papers was generously provided by Mr. Philip E. Aarons.

Licensing

If you would like to reproduce an image of a work of art in MoMA’s collection, or an image of a MoMA publication or archival material (including installation views, checklists, and press releases), please contact Art Resource (publication in North America) or Scala Archives (publication in all other geographic locations).

MoMA licenses archival audio and select out of copyright film clips from our film collection. At this time, MoMA produced video cannot be licensed by MoMA/Scala. All requests to license archival audio or out of copyright film clips should be addressed to Scala Archives at [email protected]. Motion picture film stills cannot be licensed by MoMA/Scala. For access to motion picture film stills for research purposes, please contact the Film Study Center at [email protected]. For more information about film loans and our Circulating Film and Video Library, please visit https://www.moma.org/research-and-learning/circulating-film.

If you would like to reproduce text from a MoMA publication, please email [email protected]. If you would like to publish text from MoMA’s archival materials, please fill out this permission form and send to [email protected].

Feedback

This record is a work in progress. If you have additional information or spotted an error, please send feedback to [email protected].