Introduction
Ansel Easton Adams (February 20, 1902 – April 22, 1984) was an American photographer and environmentalist. His black and white landscape photographs of the American West, especially Yosemite National Park, have been widely reproduced on calendars, posters, books, and the internet. Adams and Fred Archer developed the Zone System as a way to determine proper exposure and adjust the contrast of the final print. The resulting clarity and depth characterized his photographs. He primarily used large-format cameras because the large film used with these cameras (primarily 5x4 and 8x10) contributed to sharpness in his prints. Adams founded the photography group known as Group f/64, along with fellow photographers Willard Van Dyke and Edward Weston.
Wikidata
Q60809
Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Introduction
Adams began to photograph professionally in 1930, and in 1932 was a founding member of the f/64 group in San Francisco, California. In 1940 he created the photography department at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, New York, along with Beaumont Newhall and David McAlpin. In 1941 Adams began to photograph landscapes. From 1942 to 1944 Adams acted as the photographic adviser to the United States Army. In 1962 Adams moved to Carmel, California where he founded the Friends of Photography in 1967. He continued to document the landscape of the American West. American photographer.
Nationality
American
Gender
Male
Roles
Artist, Photographer
Names
Ansel Adams, Ansel Easton Adams
ULAN
500026108
Information from Getty’s Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License