Wikipedia entry
    Introduction
    Louise Nevelson (September 23, 1899 – April 17, 1988) was an American sculptor known for her monumental, monochromatic, wooden wall pieces and outdoor sculptures. Born in the Poltava Governorate of the Russian Empire (present-day Kyiv Oblast, Ukraine), she emigrated with her family to the United States in the early 20th century. Nevelson learned English at school, as she spoke Yiddish at home. By the early 1930s she was attending art classes at the Art Students League of New York, and in 1941 she had her first solo exhibition. A student of Hans Hofmann and Chaim Gross, Nevelson experimented with early conceptual art using found objects, and dabbled in painting and printing before dedicating her lifework to sculpture. Usually created out of wood, her sculptures appear puzzle-like, with multiple intricately cut pieces placed into wall sculptures or independently standing pieces, often 3-D. One unique feature of her work is that her figures are often painted in monochromatic black or white. A figure in the international art scene, Nevelson was showcased at the 31st Venice Biennale. Her work is seen in major collections in museums and corporations. Nevelson remains one of the most important figures in 20th-century American sculpture.
    Wikidata
    Q7531
    Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
    Getty record
    Introduction
    American sculptor, born in Ukraine.
    Nationalities
    American, Russian, Ukrainian
    Gender
    Female
    Roles
    Artist, Painter, Sculptor
    Names
    Louise Nevelson, Louise Berliawsky, Louise née Berliawsky
    Ulan
    500001621
    Information from Getty’s Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License

    Works

    62 works online

    Exhibitions

    Licensing

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