Introduction
Thomas Nast (; German: [nast]; September 27, 1840 – December 7, 1902) was a German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist often considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon". He was a critic of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine. Among his notable works were the creation of the modern version of Santa Claus (based on the traditional German figures of Sankt Nikolaus and Weihnachtsmann) and the political symbol of the elephant for the Republican Party (GOP). Contrary to popular belief, Nast did not create Uncle Sam (the male personification of the United States Federal Government), Columbia (the female personification of American values), or the Democratic donkey, though he did popularize these symbols through his artwork. Nast was associated with the magazine Harper's Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and from 1862 until 1886.
Wikidata
Q214957
Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Introduction
American illustrator of German birth, best known for his scathing political cartoon commentaries on the Civil War and the political corruptions of the 1870s. He is also known for creating such lasting images as the Republican Elephant, the Democratic Donkey, and Santa Claus, having done the illustrations for Clement C. Moore's "The Night Before Christmas." Comment on works: painter; master draughtsman; caricaturist; illustrator; cartoonist; Journalist
Nationality
American
Gender
Male
Roles
Artist, Cartoonist, Genre Artist, Illustrator, Painter
Names
Thomas Nast, Nast, Thos. Nast
Ulan
500026650
Information from Getty’s Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License

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