Introduction
Jan Brueghel (also Bruegel or Breughel) the Elder (, also US: , Dutch: [ˈjɑn ˈbrøːɣəl] (listen); 1568 – 13 January 1625) was a Flemish painter and draughtsman. He was the son of the eminent Flemish Renaissance painter Pieter Brueghel the Elder. A close friend and frequent collaborator with Peter Paul Rubens, the two artists were the leading Flemish painters in the first three decades of the 17th century. Brueghel worked in many genres including history paintings, flower still lifes, allegorical and mythological scenes, landscapes and seascapes, hunting pieces, village scenes, battle scenes and scenes of hellfire and the underworld. He was an important innovator who invented new types of paintings such as flower garland paintings, paradise landscapes, and gallery paintings in the first quarter of the 17th century. He further created genre paintings that were imitations, pastiches and reworkings of his father's works, in particular his father's genre scenes and landscapes with peasants. Brueghel represented the type of the pictor doctus, the erudite painter whose works are informed by the religious motifs and aspirations of the Catholic Counter-Reformation as well as the scientific revolution with its interest in accurate description and classification. He was court painter of the Archduke and Duchess Albrecht and Isabella, the governors of the Southern Netherlands. The artist was nicknamed "Velvet" Brueghel, "Flower" Brueghel, and "Paradise" Brueghel. The first is believed to have been given him because of his mastery in the rendering of fabrics. The second nickname is a reference to his specialization in flower still lifes and the last one to his invention of the genre of the paradise landscape. His brother Pieter Brueghel the Younger was traditionally nicknamed "de helse Brueghel" or "Hell Brueghel" because it was believed he was the author of a number of paintings with fantastic depictions of fire and grotesque imagery. These paintings have now been reattributed to Jan Brueghel the Elder.
Wikidata
Q209050
Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Introduction
He was the son of Pieter Bruegel. He is famous for small-scale history paintings, flower still-lifes, allegorical and mythological scenes, and landscapes, including imaginary mountain landscapes, forest interiors, villages and country roads, ports, river views, seascapes, hunting scenes, battles and depictions of Hell and the underworld. Died suddenly in a cholera epidemic in Antwerp; his son, Jan the younger, took over the studio.
Nationalities
Flemish, Belgian
Gender
Male
Roles
Artist, Genre Artist, Landscapist, Painter
Names
the elder Jan Brueghel, Jan Brueghel the Elder, Jan Bruegel, the elder Jan Breughel, I Jan Brueghel, Jan Brueghel, the Elder Jan Bruegel, the elder Jan Breugel
Ulan
500007095
Information from Getty’s Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License

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