A vital part of New York’s avant-garde art scene from the late 1950s to the early 1970s, Yayoi Kusama developed a distinctive style utilizing approaches associated with Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism, Pop art, Feminist art, and Institutional Critique—but she always defined herself in her own terms. “I am an obsessional artist,” she once said. “People may call me otherwise, but…I consider myself a heretic of the art world.”1

Kusama was born in 1929 into a well-off but dysfunctional family in Nagano, Japan. Largely shielded from the horrors of World War II, she was, as she has claimed, nevertheless scarred by her mother’s cruelty, her father’s infidelities, and her family’s discouragement of her interest in art making. She started painting at the age of 10 when she began experiencing the visual and aural hallucinations that would plague her, while also fueling her creativity, for the rest of her life. She has maintained that her “artwork is an expression of my life, particularly of my mental disease.”2

After a stint studying traditional Japanese painting in Kyoto, Kusama left school and moved to New York in 1958. There she felt she could pursue her art unfettered—and make waves. “When I arrived in New York, action painting was the rage…” she reflected. “I wanted to be completely detached from that and start a new art movement.”3 She began by making large-scale monochromatic paintings, for which she quickly gained critical attention. By the 1960s, the prolific artist was producing paintings, drawings, sculpture, Happenings, installation, fashion, and film. In 1969, she founded Kusama Enterprises, a commercial outlet selling clothing, bags, and even cars. These products feature her singular aesthetic, characterized by her liberal use of polka dots and dense, repeating patterns to create a sense of infinity.

In 1973, Kusama returned to Japan. Two years later, seeking treatment for her obsessive-compulsive neurosis, she entered the Seiwa Hospital for the Mentally Ill, where she lives and works to this day. She continues to produce paintings and sculpture, and, in the 1980s, added poetry and fiction to her range of creative pursuits.

Introduction by Karen Kedmey, independent art historian and writer, 2017

  1. Grady T. Turner, "Yayoi Kusama." BOMB 66, Winter 1999, http://bombmagazine.org/article/2192/yayoi-kusama. 

  2. Grady T. Turner, "Yayoi Kusama." BOMB 66, Winter 1999, http://bombmagazine.org/article/2192/yayoi-kusama. 

  3. Grady T. Turner, "Yayoi Kusama." BOMB 66, Winter 1999, http://bombmagazine.org/article/2192/yayoi-kusama. 

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Introduction
Yayoi Kusama (草間 彌生, Kusama Yayoi, born March 22, 1929) is a Japanese contemporary artist who works primarily in sculpture and installation, but is also active in painting, performance, film, fashion, poetry, fiction and other arts. During the 1960s she was a part of the New York avant-garde scene, especially in the pop-art movement. Since participating in the Japanese pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 1993 she has been exhibiting actively and has gained widespread international recognition. In 2017 a fifty-year retrospective of her work opened at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington DC. Also that year the Yayoi Kusama Museum was inaugurated in Tokyo.
Wikidata
Q231121
Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Introduction
Japanese installation artist.
Nationality
Japanese
Gender
Female
Roles
Artist, Writer, Installation artist, Painter, Performance artist, Sculptor
Names
Yayoi Kusama, Yayoi Nusama, 草間弥生, 草間彌生
Ulan
500122518
Information from Getty’s Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License