Wikipedia entry
Introduction
Fritz Henle (June 9, 1909 – January 31, 1993) was a German-born photographer, known as "Mr. Rollei" for his use of the 2.25" square format film used in the Rolleiflex camera. Called, "the last classic freelance photographer" by photohistorian, Helmut Gernsheim, he had a career spanning more than 60 years, during which he amassed an archive of more than 110,000 negatives, representing images of Europe, India, Japan, Hawai, the United States, Mexico, and the Caribbean.
Wikidata
Q85731
Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Getty record
Introduction
Born 9 June 1909; died 31 January 1993. Ca. 1930, Henle began taking photographs. He studied photography in Munich, Germany, from 1930 to 1931. From 1931 to 1932, Henle studied photography with Clarence Kennedy in Florence, Italy. He photographed Florence and its surroundings from 1932 to 1933. From 1934 to 1936, Henle worked as an advertising photographer for the Lloyd Triestino organization, travelling to Japan, China and India. In 1936, he emigrated to the United States. He became a naturalized American citizen in 1942. From 1937 to 1942, Henle worked as a photographer for Life Magazine. From 1942 to 1945, Henle worked as a photographer for the United States Office of War Information, Washington, D.C. In 1945, Henle co-founded the American Society of Magazine Photographers. In 1958, Henle settled in Saint Croix, United States Virgin Islands, and from 1960, worked as a freelance photographer.
Nationalities
German, American
Gender
Male
Roles
Artist, Photographer
Name
Fritz Henle
Ulan
500014771
Information from Getty’s Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License

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17 works online

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