Introduction
Robert Joseph Flaherty, (; February 16, 1884 – July 23, 1951) was an American filmmaker who directed and produced the first commercially successful feature-length documentary film, Nanook of the North (1922). The film made his reputation and nothing in his later life fully equaled its success, although he continued the development of this new genre of narrative documentary with Moana (1926), set in the South Seas, and Man of Aran (1934), filmed in Ireland's Aran Islands. Flaherty is considered the "father" of both the documentary and the ethnographic film. Flaherty was married to writer Frances H. Flaherty from 1914 until his death in 1951. Frances worked on several of her husband's films, and received an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Story for Louisiana Story (1948).
Wikidata
Q263148
Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License
Introduction
After living with Canadian Eskimos for 16 months, Flaherty made his first film, Nanook of the North (1922). The film explored the daily lives of the Eskimos, and is regarded as the first documentary film. Flaherty's work in this vein was highly influential, and he went on to make many more works, including Man of Aran (1934) and Louisiana Story (1948).
Nationality
American
Gender
Male
Roles
Artist, Explorer, Photographer
Names
Robert Joseph Flaherty, Robert Flaherty, Robert J. Flaherty, Bob Flaherty
Ulan
500073769
Information from Getty’s Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License