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MoMA

AUTHOR: JAMES CODDINGTON

Posts by James Coddington
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MoMA’s Jackson Pollock Conservation Project: Bringing the Project to Conclusion: Restoration of Number 1A, 1948

Jackson Pollock. Number 1A, 1948.  1948. Oil and enamel paint on canvas, 68” x 8’8.” On view at MoMA in a recent acquisitions exhibition in 1950

Jackson Pollock. Number 1A, 1948. 1948. Oil and enamel paint on canvas, 68” x 8’8.” On view at MoMA in a recent acquisitions exhibition in 1950


Readers who have been following the blog will recognize a pattern in our approach to conservation treatment of Number 1A, 1948, the final of three Jackson Pollock paintings that have been the focus of our 18-month project. Read more

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MoMA’s Jackson Pollock Conservation Project: Wrapping Up Treatment of One: Number 31, 1950
A meeting between conservators and curators to view <em>One: Number 31, 1950</em>

A meeting between conservators and curators to view One: Number 31, 1950 as Pollock would have during its creation: laid horizontally

Throughout the project, we’ve been working closely with curators in MoMA’s Department of Painting and Sculpture, and this exchange of ideas surrounding Pollock has enriched and informed the treatment process. During one such meeting, we took advantage of the opportunity to view One: Number 31,1950 as Pollock saw it during its inception: laid horizontally. Read more

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MoMA’s Jackson Pollock Conservation Project: Insight into the Artist’s Process
Pollock at work in his studio, 1950. Photo: Hans Namuth

Jackson Pollock at work in his studio, 1950. Photo: Hans Namuth

In the May 1951 issue of ARTnews a selection of photographs by Hans Namuth appeared as illustrations for Robert Goodnough’s article, “Pollock Paints a Picture.” The images depict a focused  Pollock energetically applying paint to a large canvas spread across his studio floor. Read more

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MoMA’s Jackson Pollock Conservation Project: One: Number 31, 1950—Characterizing the Paint Surface Part 2
Conservation scientist Chris McGlinchey conducts elemental analysis using a handheld X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyzer

Conservation scientist Chris McGlinchey conducts elemental analysis using a handheld X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyzer

Empirical examination and scientific analysis are fundamental to conservation research and treatment; conservators frequently collaborate with scientists in order to clarify specific questions: to identify materials, elucidate degradation mechanisms, or test the efficacy of conservation methods. Read more

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February 22, 2013  |  Artists, Conservation, Jackson Pollock Project
MoMA’s Jackson Pollock Conservation Project: One: Number 31, 1950—Characterizing the Paint Surface Part 1
MoMA Assistant Conservator Jennifer Hickey inspects the paint surface of One: Number 31, 1950 under magnification

MoMA Assistant Conservator Jennifer Hickey inspects the paint surface of One: Number 31, 1950 under magnification

In our last post, we took a closer look at the variety of visual effects Pollock was able to achieve with his painting technique. We also observed some passages of paint that don’t appear to fit the typical characteristics of poured house paint. So we set out to investigate this seeming inconsistency. Read more

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January 8, 2013  |  Artists, Conservation, Jackson Pollock Project
MoMA’s Jackson Pollock Conservation Project: Looking Closely at One: Number 31, 1950
Before Treatment photograph of One: Number 31, 1950

One: Number 31, 1950 before treatment

It’s a good time to be studying and working on Jackson Pollock’s paintings. With projects also underway at the Seattle Art Museum and  The J. Paul Getty Museum Read more

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MoMA’s Jackson Pollock Conservation Project—An Ounce of Prevention…

We covered a lot of territory in our last post, documenting Echo’s condition and treating the discolored canvas. Our efforts have produced satisfying results. Read more