Massimo Scolari. Addio Melampo Project, Oblique projection. 1975

Massimo Scolari Addio Melampo Project, Oblique projection 1975

  • Not on view

Massimo Scolari used images to manipulate form without using Renaissance or neoclassical styles. His drawings are pure fantasy and often defy explanation. In Urban Passage, geometric forms resembling a house seem to be projected onto a mythical landscape by the sky. In Addio Melampo, these forms emanate from the earth itself. Its title refers both to the name of a dog in an Italian novel and to a mythical Greek man who can see the future and understand the voices of animals, although for Scolari there is not necessarily a connection between the title and the image of a drawing. Addio Melampo is clearly a drawing born from imagination.

Publication excerpt from an essay by Bevin Cline and Tina di Carlo, in Terence Riley, ed., The Changing of the Avant-Garde: Visionary Architectural Drawings from the Howard Gilman Collection, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 2002, p. 125.
Medium
Colored ink, watercolor, and graphite on board
Dimensions
11 7/8 x 10" (30.2 x 25.4 cm)
Credit
Gift of The Howard Gilman Foundation
Object number
1294.2000
Copyright
© 2020 Massimo Scolari
Department
Architecture and Design

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