David Shrigley. Untitled (Refrigerator) from an untitled portfolio. 2005

David Shrigley Untitled (Refrigerator) from an untitled portfolio 2005

  • Not on view

"I'm actually trying to make things that are accessible and enjoyable to others," Shrigley has said. Like a compulsive doodler with an infectiously mordant sense of humor, the Glasgow-based artist makes deceptively simple-looking drawings and, to a lesser extent, paintings. Complete with childlike stick figures and crudely scrawled texts, they speak to the paranoid fantasies and everyday pathos of adulthood.

Shrigley, who is highly prolific, has compiled many of his images into artist's books and other printed formats that can circulate to large audiences—such as series of etchings and, most recently, these woodcuts. In the woodcut at left, Shrigley conjures up the cartoon language of sleep; his repeated Z's also make a typically self-deprecating comment about the possible "snooze factor" of his art or, perhaps, other types of art involving similarly repetitive geometries, such as Minimalism. Composed of boldly graphic slashes, Shrigley's Z's suggest the sound of sawing through wood, the process by which this image was made. "I liked the physicality of cutting the [wood] plates," the artist has said. "It was very brutal and slightly haphazard, perhaps a little crude, which I think makes the images sit comfortably alongside my drawings."

Publication excerpt from The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA Highlights since 1980, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 2007, p. 247.
Medium
One from a portfolio of 22 woodcuts
Dimensions
composition and sheet: 23 9/16 x 15 11/16" (59.8 x 39.9 cm)
Publisher
Galleri Nicolai Wallner, Copenhagen
Printer
Schaefer Grafiske Vaerksted, Copenhagen
Edition
20
Credit
The Associates Fund
Object number
292.2006.19
Copyright
© 2021 David Shrigley
Portfolio
Untitled
Department
Drawings and Prints

Installation views

How we identified these works

In 2018–19, MoMA collaborated with Google Arts & Culture Lab on a project using machine learning to identify artworks in installation photos. That project has concluded, and works are now being identified by MoMA staff.

If you notice an error, please contact us at [email protected].

Licensing

If you would like to reproduce an image of a work of art in MoMA’s collection, or an image of a MoMA publication or archival material (including installation views, checklists, and press releases), please contact Art Resource (publication in North America) or Scala Archives (publication in all other geographic locations).

MoMA licenses archival audio and select out of copyright film clips from our film collection. At this time, MoMA produced video cannot be licensed by MoMA/Scala. All requests to license archival audio or out of copyright film clips should be addressed to Scala Archives at [email protected]. Motion picture film stills cannot be licensed by MoMA/Scala. For access to motion picture film stills for research purposes, please contact the Film Study Center at [email protected]. For more information about film loans and our Circulating Film and Video Library, please visit https://www.moma.org/research-and-learning/circulating-film.

If you would like to reproduce text from a MoMA publication, please email [email protected]. If you would like to publish text from MoMA’s archival materials, please fill out this permission form and send to [email protected].

Feedback

This record is a work in progress. If you have additional information or spotted an error, please send feedback to [email protected].