Just Above Midtown: Changing Spaces

Just Above Midtown Newsletter, May 5, 1987. Collection Linda Goode Bryant, New York

Conclusion to Just Above Midtown: Changing Spaces 380

Just Above Midtown Newsletter, May 5, 1987. Collection Linda Goode Bryant, New York

Artist, Randy Williams: Just Above Midtown, as much as it is a physical entity, I think it’s also a spiritual entity as well. It created, for a lot of us, this extended family.

Linda Goode Bryant: There was arguments, there were thoughts and ideas. There were debates that were going on.

JAM curator and artist, Tony Whitfield: It’s where you actually would meet people in other disciplines, who are people of color. But you also met all of these folks who wanted to be involved with them.

Artist, Kaylynn Sullivan TwoTrees: I think that there was something about the time of JAM, the place of JAM, the liberty that JAM offered us and the kind of collective care that people had for each other.

Randy Williams: I’m still a part of that connection with all of those things that happened.

Artist, Senga Nengudi: It’s sort of like when you throw a rock into a pond. That’s how JAM was. It kept expanding and getting larger and more beautiful.

JAM volunteer, art historian, and curator, Horace Brockington: It was a forum for letting people know the diversity of Black artists. There’s no one aesthetic that ever ran through.

JAM curator and artist, Kathleen Goncharov: Anything goes. Basically, you could do anything if you could figure out how to do it.

JAM volunteer, art historian, and curator, Lowery Stokes Sims: JAM was a rule-breaking experiment in highlighting the work of artists who would’ve not got any recognition and spawned many of their careers. And I think it lives through the relationships that were built.

Linda Goode Bryant: And it was electric, it was alive. It was unexpected. Every moment you didn’t know what to expect. It was life-giving. It really was.

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