Just Above Midtown: Changing Spaces

Body Print-In held in conjunction with David Hammons’s exhibition *Greasy Bags and Barbeque Bones* (1975), Philip Yenawine’s house, New York, May 19, 1975

Body Print-In held in conjunction with David Hammons’s exhibition Greasy Bags and Barbeque Bones (1975), Philip Yenawine’s house, New York, May 19, 1975 367

Photographs by Jeff Morgan. Collection Linda Goode Bryant, New York

Lowery Stokes Sims: It was clear from the beginning that a focus at JAM would be David Hammons, because he was so out there.

Linda Goode Bryant: When I first saw David’s Body Prints, my brain just exploded in terms of how the figure was portrayed through the printing of the body. It was a way of abstracting the figure.

Gylbert Coker: David would take baby lotion and just rub it on his body, and then he would roll onto the paper to make that imprint, and then he would shake the powdered pigment and then blow it away, and then the image would come up.

Linda Goode Bryant: So the Body Prints sold. And, in fact, I was preparing for this Body Print show at JAM and had pre-sold them. And he says, “I’m not doing body prints anymore.”

AC Hudgins: Most people in life, when they hit a note and it’s working, they keep working it. He hit a note in those Body Prints and they were selling. But he says, I’m finished. I got to move. And I respect that.

I remember one time I was going to a wedding, and I gave them a Body Print and she told me after a while, she said, “AC, you know, that Body Print you gave me was pretty much the ugliest piece of shit in the world. And I really don’t like it.” I said, “Well fine, give it back. I’ll give you something else.” So, she gave it back and I gave her a beautiful porcelain bowl. And the last time I saw her, she said, “What do these things sell for now?” I said, "You don’t want to know.”

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