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Meet Me The MoMA Alzheimer's Project: Making Art Accessible to People with Dementia

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About The MoMA Alzheimer's Project

The MoMA Alzheimer's Project was a special initiative in the Museum's Department of Education.The initiative took place from 2007 to 2014 and was generously funded by MetLife Foundation. During this time, MoMA staff expanded on the success of the Museum’s existing education programs for individuals with Alzheimer's disease and their care partners through the development of training resources intended for use by arts and health professionals on how to make art accessible to people with dementia using MoMA's teaching methodologies and approach.

MoMA remains as committed as ever to providing programming for individuals living with dementia and their care partners and to supporting the development and success of this type of programming around the world. To that end, the Museum will continue to offer engaging programming and resources for this key constituency. For more information on MoMA's ongoing education programs for individuals with Alzheimer's disease or dementia and their care partners, visit our Programs page.

In addition, MoMA staff will continue to provide resources, information, and advice to other organizations and to facilitate training workshops locally, nationally, and abroad. We are poised to maintain our role as a connector in this field- to serve as a hub for conversations on aging and creativity and to provide a vital link for colleagues around the world who are interested in making art accessible to people with dementia. For more information on these continued efforts please write to accessprograms@moma.org.


These videos present an overview of The MoMA Alzheimer's Project outreach efforts, and include insights from colleagues who have initiated new museum programs for individuals with Alzheimer's disease and their care partners around the world.



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