Sites of Reason: A Selection of Recent Acquisitions

Steel
240 3/16 x 1 5/16" (610 x 3.3 cm) and 86 5/8 x 1 5/16" (220 x 3.3 cm)
Partial gift of the Daled Collection and partial purchase through the generosity of Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Agnes Gund, Marie Josée and Henry R. Kravis, and Jerry I. Speyer and Katherine G. Farley
© 2014 Peter Downsbrough / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Peter Downsbrough. Two Pipes. 1972

Steel, 240 3/16 x 1 5/16" (610 x 3.3 cm) and 86 5/8 x 1 5/16" (220 x 3.3 cm). Partial gift of the Daled Collection and partial purchase through the generosity of Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, Agnes Gund, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis, and Jerry I. Speyer and Katherine G. Farley

Glenn Lowry: Two Pipes by Peter Downsbrough is part of the exhibition Sites of Reason: A Selection of Recent Acquisitions, which is on view on the third floor of the Museum. Artist Peter Downsbrough:

Peter Downsbrough: The two pipes are set up in the sense that the one pipe, the long one, is the standard pipe which is 21 feet, and 6 meters in metrics. That pipe was set in the ground to a depth of about 2 feet just to hold it, to be solid. And the other pipe was cut at some length, an indeterminate length. So there's the act of cutting, and then the distance was regulated between them. They were always 3 inches apart.

Because they're rooted in the ground, it becomes more of a point in the landscape; and I mean for that cityscape or traditional landscape. Some people stop and they say, "Oh, look at that." And then there are other people that walk right by it and don't see it. But that is quite all right with me, and I think that's absolutely normal because if you're walking down the street and we're walking together down the street, you see one thing, I see something else. And that's what creates a discussion and an interaction between people and the environment.

0:00
8 / 8