New Photography 2011

Doug Rickard. _#32.700542, Dallas, TX_. 2009. 2010. Pigmented inkjet print, 20 3/4 x 33 1/4" (52.7 x 84.5 cm). Courtesy the artist; Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco; and Yossi Milo Gallery, New York. © 2011 Doug Rickard

Doug Rickard. #32.700542, Dallas, TX 2009. 2010

Pigmented inkjet print
20 3/4 x 33 1/4" (52.7 x 84.5 cm)
Courtesy the artist; Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco; and Yossi Milo Gallery, New York. © 2011 Doug Rickard

DOUG RICKARD: My name is Doug Rickard.

I wanted to use Google as the medium, but I didn't necessarily want the project to be about Google. In my studio I set up a large monitor, which I'd also use for navigating. I would frame in the monitor on a tripod, and I shot it with digital, and then as I started to explore, I was looking for the inverse of the American Dream. And then I also found website called City Data. I would find all of these neighborhoods with people talking about why you wouldn't want to live in this place. I started to explore these areas where the image was really loose, and what people would look at, and say "oh, that's sort of a crummy resolution." I could find scenes where the breakdown, even the flaws of the image, the lines, the half blurred faces, where those things worked to just build up the poetry of this look at America that I was wanting to do.

I wouldn't feel that comfortable walking down the middle of the street or taking exteriors of people, almost as if they were objects, but Google's machines had done all of that. The people didn't necessarily know that they were being photographed.

I spent a lot of time in the neighborhoods of Dallas. This dog had a look to him that also was a certain look that I would get from people looking back at the cameras. There was a certain amount of aggression there. There was also brokenness in the scene, as if you're in an area where you and the place have been abandoned. I looked at this project as containing these layers of conversation, privacy being one of them, but also race, socioeconomics, photography's history and tradition, photography's future. It's not about the person. It’s about bigger things than that. It's about the situation that people are in, and it's about America.

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