Skip to main content

Paul GOLDBERGER

3 articles

EXHIBITION

Gaetano Pesce: Projects for a Skyscraper

PUBLISHED

8 March 1979

A Quarrel Over Architecture

By Paul GOLDBERGER

EARLIER this week, with virtually no fanfare, the Museum of Modern Art opened a small exhibition of the work of Gaetano Pesce, an Italian architect known for his visionary schemes. The circumstances of the show were curious:

New York Times • page C18 • 1,015 words

EXHIBITION

Contrasts of Form: Geometric Abstract Art, 1910–1980

PUBLISHED

8 September 1985

MUSEUMS SET THE TONE IN ARCHITECTURE

By Paul GOLDBERGER

This season in architecture will belong, more than any in years, to the museum. Three museum buildings of national importance will open in the first few weeks of autumn: the National Building Museum - housed in one of Washington's greatest works of 19th-century architecture, the Pension Building -will open its doors Sept. 20; the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College, by the distinguished architect Charles Moore, will make its debut with a weeklong series of events at the end of September, and the Sackler Wing, a major addition to Harvard's Fogg Art Museum and the first museum in the United States by the great British architect James Stirling, will open in October. But it is not only as works of architecture in themselves that museums will hold our attention. The season will be spanned by two major exhibitions - an extensive review of 20th-century American design at the Whitney Museum, which will open Sept. 19 and run through Feb. 16, and an elaborate, wide-ranging retrospective of the work of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe at the Museum of Modern Art from Feb. 5 through April 16, 1986. The exhibition at the Modern, which will draw heavily from the museum's Mies van der Rohe Archive, celebrates the centennial of Mies's birth on March 27, 1886.

New York Times • Arts • page 43 • 1,863 words

EXHIBITION

A Modern Museum: The 1939 Goodwin/Stone Building

PUBLISHED

11 June 1989

A Wistful Ode to a Museum That Once Was

By Paul GOLDBERGER

LEAD: A month and a day ago, on May 10, the Museum of Modern Art marked half a century in its home at 11 West 53d Street. The museum has observed the date in part by unveiling a handsome and discreet renovation of its sculpture garden, also 50 years old, by the architects Philip Johnson and John Burgee and the landscape architect Robert Zion.

New York Times • Arts • page 35 • 1,378 words