Hélio Oiticica. B16 – Bolide – Box 12, “Archeological”. 1964-65

Hélio Oiticica B16 – Bolide – Box 12, “Archeological” 1964-65

  • Not on view

Around 1963 Oiticica began work on his series titled Bólides (Fireballs), one of the most distinctive, unique, and inventive sculptural models made in the Americas during the second half of the twentieth century. These works represent one of the three categories of works produced by the artist at the end of his career: Bólides, Penetrables, and Parangolés. The Bólides are structures made of painted wood or glass containing raw pigment, stones, and textiles. The Penetrables are small labyrinths of painted wood that can be entered, or penetrated, by the spectator. The Parangolés, or "capes," are complex and colorful carnivalesque costumes that were meant to be worn or held by the spectator, therefore eliminating the distance between the work and the public. These three series embody a revolutionary conception of artworks as significant vehicles for the human body and as bodies themselves, filled with living, critical, or troubling materials.

Gallery label from New Perspectives in Latin American Art, 1930–2006: Selections from a Decade of Acquisitions, November 21, 2007–February 25, 2008.

Oiticica's Bólides (Fireballs) series, begun around 1963, embodies one of the most distinctive, unique, and inventive notions of sculpture conceived in the Americas in the second half of the twentieth century. The Bólides, structures made of painted wood or glass containing raw pigment, stones, and textiles, make up one category of the artist's late work. He also made Penetrables, small labyrinths of painted wood that can be entered, or penetrated, by the spectator, and Parangolés (Capes), complex and colorful carnivalesque costumes that were meant to be worn or held by the spectator. These three series embody a revolutionary conception of artworks as significant vehicles for the human body and as bodies themselves, filled with living, critical, or troubling materials.

Gallery label from Here Is Every. Four Decades of Contemporary Art, September 10, 2008–March 23, 2009 .
Medium
PVA and vinyl-acrylic paint with earth on wood structure, nylon net, corrugated cardboard, mirror, glass, rocks, earth, and fluorescent lamp
Dimensions
14 1/2 x 51 5/8 x 20 1/2" (37 x 131.2 x 52.1 cm)
Credit
Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros in honor of Paulo Herkenhoff
Object number
326.2004.a-d
Copyright
© 2019 Projeto Hélio Oiticica
Department
Painting and Sculpture
The artist.
? - 1996, Galeria César Aché, Río de Janeiro .
1996 - 2004, Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, New York, and Caracas , purchased through Galeria César Aché.
2004, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, acquired as gift from Patricia Phelps de Cisneros.
MoMA Exh. #1931: "Painting and Sculpture: Inaugural Installation", 4th Floor, gallery 23, November 20, 2004 - December 11, 2006

As of August 23, 2005, 4th Floor, gallery 23 has been renumbered as 4th Floor, gallery 24.

Austin, Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas, "The Geometry of Hope: Latin American Geometrical Abstraction from the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection", February 17, 2007 - April 5, 2007

MoMA Exh. #2022: "New Perspectives in Latin American Art, 1930-2006: Selections from a Decade of Acquisitions", 3rd Floor, November 21, 2007 - February 25, 2008

MoMA Exh. #2053: "Here is Every: Four Decades of Contemporary Art", 2nd Floor Contemporary Galleries, September 9, 2008 - March 23, 2009

Sao Paulo, Pinacoteca do Estado de Sao Paulo, "The Enclosed Openness: Box and Book in Brazilian Art", October 20, 2012 - January 13, 2013

Madrid, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, "La invención concreta. Collección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros", January 22 - September 16, 2013

MoMA Exh. #2351: "From the Collection: 1960-1969", 4th Floor, The Alfred H. Barr, Jr. Painting and Sculpture Galleries, March 26, 2016 - September 13, 2016

Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art, "Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium", October 1, 2016 - January 2, 2017 and tour:
Chicago, Art Institute of Chicago, February 9 - May 7, 2017
New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, July 14 - October 1, 2017

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