Daniel Buren. One Painting in Four Elements for One Wall. 1969-77

Daniel Buren One Painting in Four Elements for One Wall 1969-77

  • Not on view

In the late 1960s Buren devised a signature visual device: alternating colored and white stripes, each exactly 8.7 centimeters wide (about 3.5 inches), the standard for stripes on commercial awning fabric. Buren's "paintings" began to appear not only in art contexts but also in urban locations—on walls of buildings, in store windows, and in subway stations. In 1977 Buren cut up one of his artworks from 1969 and made a new work, designating that the sections should hang in the corners of a wall, whether that wall was empty, had doors or windows, or even had other artworks hanging on it.

Gallery label from Multiplex: New Directions in Art, 1970 to Now, November 21, 2007-July 28, 2008.
Medium
Synthetic polymer paint on striped cotton fabric, in four parts
Dimensions
Overall dimensions variable
Credit
Kay Sage Tanguy Fund
Object number
231.1978.a-d
Copyright
© 2019 Daniel Buren / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris
Department
Painting and Sculpture

Installation views

MoMA collaborated with Google Arts & Culture Lab on a project using machine learning to identify artworks in installation photos.

If you notice an error, please contact us at digital@moma.org.

If you would like to reproduce an image of a work of art in MoMA’s collection, or an image of a MoMA publication or archival material (including installation views, checklists, and press releases), please contact Art Resource (publication in North America) or Scala Archives (publication in all other geographic locations).

All requests to license audio or video footage produced by MoMA should be addressed to Scala Archives at firenze@scalarchives.com. Motion picture film stills or motion picture footage from films in MoMA's Film Collection cannot be licensed by MoMA/Scala. For licensing motion picture film footage it is advised to apply directly to the copyright holders. For access to motion picture film stills please contact the Film Study Center. More information is also available about the film collection and the Circulating Film and Video Library.

If you would like to reproduce text from a MoMA publication or moma.org, please email text_permissions@moma.org. If you would like to publish text from MoMA’s archival materials, please fill out this permission form and send to archives@moma.org.

This record is a work in progress. If you have additional information or spotted an error, please send feedback to digital@moma.org.