Agnes Martin. The Tree. 1964

Agnes Martin The Tree 1964

  • Not on view

Of the genesis of her paintings, Martin said, "When I first made a grid I happened to be thinking of the innocence of trees and then this grid came into my mind and I thought it represented innocence, and I still do, and so I painted it and then I was satisfied. I thought, this is my vision." Martin rendered fine vertical lines and lightly shaded horizontal bands in oil and pencil, softening the geometric grid, which in this case seems to expand beyond the confines of the canvas. For Martin the grid evoked not a human measure but an ethereal onethe boundless order or transcendent reality associated with Eastern philosophies.

Gallery label from Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction, April 19 - August 13, 2017.

“When I first made a grid,” Martin said, “I happened to be thinking of the innocence of trees and then this grid came into my mind and I thought it represented innocence . . . and so I painted it and then I was satisfied. I thought, this is my vision.” Martin made fine vertical lines and lightly shaded horizontal bands in oil and pencil, softening the geometric structure, which seems to expand beyond the confines of the canvas. For Martin the grid evoked not a human measure but an ethereal one—the boundless order or transcendent reality associated with Eastern philosophies.

Gallery label from 2011.

Of the genesis of her paintings, Martin said, "When I first made a grid I happened to be thinking of the innocence of trees and then this grid came into my mind and I thought it represented innocence, and I still do, and so I painted it and then I was satisfied. I thought, this is my vision." Martin rendered fine vertical lines and lightly shaded horizontal bands in oil and pencil, softening the geometric grid, which in this case seems to expand beyond the confines of the canvas. For Martin the grid evoked not a human measure but an ethereal one—the boundless order or transcendent reality associated with Eastern philosophies.

Gallery label from 2007.
Medium
Oil and pencil on canvas
Dimensions
6 x 6' (182.8 x 182.8 cm)
Credit
Larry Aldrich Foundation Fund
Object number
5.1965
Copyright
© 2018 Estate of Agnes Martin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Department
Painting and Sculpture

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