Christian Schad Schadograph 1918

  • Not on view

The artist's "schadographs" are among the earliest intentionally abstract photographs. Using the cameraless photogram technique—in existence since the discovery of photography but previously unused for artistic purposes—Schad covered the surfaces of light-sensitive paper with various objects and then left them to develop by his windowsill. He preferred worn materials, such as scraps of paper and bits of fabric, often searching for these things on the streets and in garbage cans. Schad frequently extended his assault on artistic tradition by cutting a jagged border around the schadographs, "to free them," as he explained, "from the convention of the square."

Gallery label from Dada, June 18–September 11, 2006.
Medium
Gelatin silver printing-out-paper print
Dimensions
(irregular): 2 5/16 x 3 1/4" (5.9 x 8.3 cm)
Credit
Purchase
Object number
288.1937
Copyright
© 2018 / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Germany
Department
Photography

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