Eero Saarinen Womb Chair (Exhibited in the US Pavilion in the 1951 Milan Triennale) 1946

  • Not on view

Saarinen, an architect, designed this chair shortly after joining Knoll Associates in 1943. Its name expresses its purpose: "It was designed on the theory that a great number of people have never really felt comfortable and secure since they left the womb. The chair is an attempt to rectify this maladjustment in our civilization." Saarinen further explained, "There seemed to be a need for a large and really comfortable chair to take the place of the old overstuffed chair. . . . Today, more than ever before, we need to relax."

Gallery label from What Was Good Design? MoMA's Message 1944–56, May 6, 2009–January 10, 2011.
Manufacturer
Manufactured by Knoll Associates, New York, NY
Medium
Upholstered latex foam on fiberglass-reinforced plastic shell and chrome-plated steel rod base
Dimensions
36 1/2 x 40 x 34" (92.7 x 101.6 x 86.4 cm)
Credit
Gift of the manufacturer
Object number
447.1956.a-c
Department
Architecture and Design

If you would like to reproduce an image of a work of art in MoMA’s collection, or an image of a MoMA publication or archival material (including installation views, checklists, and press releases), please contact Art Resource (publication in North America) or Scala Archives (publication in all other geographic locations).

All requests to license audio or video footage produced by MoMA should be addressed to Scala Archives at firenze@scalarchives.com. Motion picture film stills or motion picture footage from films in MoMA's Film Collection cannot be licensed by MoMA/Scala. For licensing motion picture film footage it is advised to apply directly to the copyright holders. For access to motion picture film stills please contact the Film Study Center. More information is also available about the film collection and the Circulating Film and Video Library.

If you would like to reproduce text from a MoMA publication or moma.org, please email text_permissions@moma.org. If you would like to publish text from MoMA’s archival materials, please fill out this permission form and send to archives@moma.org.

This record is a work in progress. If you have additional information or spotted an error, please send feedback to digital@moma.org.