Rasheed Araeen. (3+4) SR. 1969

Rasheed Araeen (3+4) SR 1969

  • MoMA, Floor 4, 413 The David Geffen Wing

“The presence of diagonals in my work is not my own creation,” said Araeen, who was influenced by his training as an engineer in Karachi before moving to London in 1964. “They are fundamental to the very formation of the lattice structure in engineering.” Resembling a mathematical equation, this work’s title, (3+4) SR, refers to its three raw and four painted wood lattices; SR stands for “structure” and “relief.” The work features open frameworks arranged in a zigzag pattern. For the artist, work like this modeled his aspiration “to create symmetry within human relationships and other forms of life.”

Gallery label from "Collection: 1940s—1970s", 2019
Medium
Wood and painted wood, in 7 parts
Dimensions
Overall 67 x 87 x 4" (170 x 221 x 10 cm)
Credit
Purchase
Object number
724.2018.a-g
Department
Painting and Sculpture

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