Wolf Vostell. B 52 Lipstick Bomber. 1968

Wolf Vostell B 52 Lipstick Bomber 1968

  • MoMA, Floor 4, 412 The David Geffen Wing

Vostell often utilized mass-media images of destruction in his examination of consumer culture. This critical, explicitly political stance was a primary strategy of artists associated with Capitalist Realism, established in West Germany in the early 1960s by Vostell (along with Gerhard Richter and Sigmar Polke, whose works are on view nearby) as a parody of an art movement. In this work, Vostell adapted a widely circulated war photograph of a Boeing B-52 plane dropping bombs over Vietnam. He replaced the bombs with tubes of lipstick—equating mindless consumerism with apathy toward contemporary injustices and violence.

Gallery label from "Collection 1940s—1970s", 2019
Medium
Multiple of screenprint with lipstick additions
Dimensions
Frame: 39 5/16 × 50 1/4 × 4 7/8" (99.9 × 127.7 × 12.4 cm)
Publisher
Galerie Art Intermedia, Cologne
Printer
Kindermann and Giesen, Cologne
Edition
artist's proof outside the edition of 20
Credit
The Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III Endowment
Object number
609.2016
Copyright
© 2020 Wolf Vostell / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn
Department
Drawings and Prints

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