Frederick Kiesler. Endless House Project, Interior perspective. 1951

Frederick Kiesler Endless House Project, Interior perspective 1951

  • Not on view

Ovoid and biomorphic, with floors that slope into walls and walls that slope into ceilings, the sculpted concrete form of the Endless House is designed, the architect said, to be "endless like the human body—there is no beginning and no end." In this decades–long project to invent a new kind of architectural space, Kiesler sought to combine sculpture, architecture, the environment, and poetry. To describe this multitasking space, plan drawings of cocoonlike interiors are layered with acetate sheets. Superimposition allows the proposal to retain its flexibility: transparent sheets note possible architectural programs in red ("group living" and "individual recreation"), and lines indicating new vectors of space can be added to or subtracted from the design.

Gallery label from Cut 'n' Paste: From Architectural Assemblage to Collage City, July 10–December 1, 2013.
Medium
.a: Ink and ink wash on paper .b: Ink on tracing paper .c: Ink on acetate
Dimensions
.a: 14 3/4 x 17 7/8" (37.5 x 45.7 cm) .b: 14 1/4 x 17 1/2" (36.2 x 44.5 cm) .c: 14 7/8 x 18" (37.9 x 45.7 cm)
Credit
Purchase
Object number
SC37.1966.a-c
Department
Architecture and Design

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